#101 [url]

Aug 23 16 2:44 AM

Lavender Lynn wrote:

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Lavender Lynn wrote:
I have made and reviewed   http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greek-pork-chops-23991 by Diner524


We used a charcoal grill with Kingsford briquettes.

1. I only use the amt of charcoal needed to cook what is on that menu, for today's recipe that means just a small amt.
If I am cooking for a large group will cover the entire bottom with charcoal.

2. When I am done grilling, I put the lid on the grill.  That way there are partially used briquettes to help start the next barbecue.



image 



More great-looking chops - yum!  Thanks for the helpful tips and techniques as well.


***Your review is not yet showing on Zazz - please watch for it to be sure it shows up***


My review is on the recipe.  My name on recipezazz is Pelysma.


 


Got it -- thanks for letting me know.

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#102 [url]

Aug 23 16 4:33 AM

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Cookgirl wrote:
For Team Sisters of the Traveling Pants I have completed this challenge:



http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greek-style-grilled-stuffed-chicken-23979 by diner





 



Hi CG,

Your review is not yet showing on Zazz and you have some components missing on this challenge.  : )
 

Ooops! I had another window open working on this then forgot to finish it!
 


Tips: We chose a combinatioin of alder (a Pacific Northwest wood common with the Oregon Native American tribes for preparing fish especially salmon) and apple chips (www.cookingwoods.com) for this grilled chicken recipe. Pounding the meat first to about a 1/2" thickness
helps avoid burning the outside of the chicken before the center has a chance to cook thoroughly. (This is my suggestion but others may have a different opinion.) Our grill is charcoal-powered and is also equipped with a smoker. The husband is a big fan of Alton Brown and uses his method for checking the temperature when grilling meats/chicken: (1) heavy duty aluminum foil and (2) always employ a thermometer-especially for poultry. He purchased a good quality thermometer last summer and it has made a huge difference in the outcome of grilled food. 

 photo waltographregular_zps2e2655c9.png

Last Edited By: Cookgirl Aug 23 16 4:40 AM. Edited 2 times.

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#103 [url]

Aug 23 16 7:41 AM

Lavender Lynn wrote:

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Lavender Lynn wrote:
I have made and reviewed   http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greek-pork-chops-23991 by Diner524


We used a charcoal grill with Kingsford briquettes.

1. I only use the amt of charcoal needed to cook what is on that menu, for today's recipe that means just a small amt.
If I am cooking for a large group will cover the entire bottom with charcoal.

2. When I am done grilling, I put the lid on the grill.  That way there are partially used briquettes to help start the next barbecue.



image 



More great-looking chops - yum!  Thanks for the helpful tips and techniques as well.


***Your review is not yet showing on Zazz - please watch for it to be sure it shows up***


My review is on the recipe.  My name on recipezazz is Pelysma.


 


And, of course, Zazz is down right now -- will try later.  GRRRR!

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#104 [url]

Aug 23 16 7:44 AM

Cookgirl wrote:

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Cookgirl wrote:
For Team Sisters of the Traveling Pants I have completed this challenge:



http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greek-style-grilled-stuffed-chicken-23979 by diner







 



Hi CG,

Your review is not yet showing on Zazz and you have some components missing on this challenge.  : )
 

Ooops! I had another window open working on this then forgot to finish it!
 


Tips: We chose a combinatioin of alder (a Pacific Northwest wood common with the Oregon Native American tribes for preparing fish especially salmon) and apple chips (www.cookingwoods.com) for this grilled chicken recipe. Pounding the meat first to about a 1/2" thickness
helps avoid burning the outside of the chicken before the center has a chance to cook thoroughly. (This is my suggestion but others may have a different opinion.) Our grill is charcoal-powered and is also equipped with a smoker. The husband is a big fan of Alton Brown and uses his method for checking the temperature when grilling meats/chicken: (1) heavy duty aluminum foil and (2) always employ a thermometer-especially for poultry. He purchased a good quality thermometer last summer and it has made a huge difference in the outcome of grilled food. 


Thanks so much CG for the tips and techniques.   My DD gave my DH a thermometer for Christmas that you can track on your computer somehow.  You insert it into the meat and you can watch it from the computer.  I guess you can see that my DH doesn't like tending the grill -- he loves to walk away and then returns to find a bonfire.  SHHH!  Don't let him know that I broadcasted that info. : ) LOL

***As soon as I can access Zazz, I'll get pg 1 updated.

Last Edited By: Nancys Pantry Aug 23 16 8:32 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#106 [url]

Aug 23 16 9:35 PM

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Cookgirl wrote:

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Cookgirl wrote:
For Team Sisters of the Traveling Pants I have completed this challenge:



http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greek-style-grilled-stuffed-chicken-23979 by diner








 



Hi CG,

Your review is not yet showing on Zazz and you have some components missing on this challenge.  : )
 

Ooops! I had another window open working on this then forgot to finish it!
 


Tips: We chose a combinatioin of alder (a Pacific Northwest wood common with the Oregon Native American tribes for preparing fish especially salmon) and apple chips (www.cookingwoods.com) for this grilled chicken recipe. Pounding the meat first to about a 1/2" thickness
helps avoid burning the outside of the chicken before the center has a chance to cook thoroughly. (This is my suggestion but others may have a different opinion.) Our grill is charcoal-powered and is also equipped with a smoker. The husband is a big fan of Alton Brown and uses his method for checking the temperature when grilling meats/chicken: (1) heavy duty aluminum foil and (2) always employ a thermometer-especially for poultry. He purchased a good quality thermometer last summer and it has made a huge difference in the outcome of grilled food. 


Thanks so much CG for the tips and techniques.   My DD gave my DH a thermometer for Christmas that you can track on your computer somehow.  You insert it into the meat and you can watch it from the computer.  I guess you can see that my DH doesn't like tending the grill -- he loves to walk away and then returns to find a bonfire.  SHHH!  Don't let him know that I broadcasted that info. : ) LOL

***As soon as I can access Zazz, I'll get pg 1 updated.

It's probably the same thermometer my husband bought. He uses his iPhone. 

 photo waltographregular_zps2e2655c9.png

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#108 [url]

Aug 24 16 8:21 PM

image

For the Pi Rho Maniacs, I have made and reviewed the following for the "Grill It Up Challenge":

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html by Lynn Dine

image

image

I cooked these delicious kebabs on my gas grill. We loved the tang that the lemon in the marinade gave to the chicken. I offer the following tips when cooking kebabs on the grill:
--I always use metal skewers. It seems that no matter how long I soak wooden skewers in water, they still burn and catch on fire.
--I like to use a kebab grill to hold the skewers instead of putting the kebabs directly on the barbecue grill. I feel that I can control the cooking of the kebabs better with less burning.


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#109 [url]

Aug 24 16 9:24 PM

Bayhill wrote:
image

For the Pi Rho Maniacs, I have made and reviewed the following for the "Grill It Up Challenge":

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html by Lynn Dine

image

image

I cooked these delicious kebabs on my gas grill. We loved the tang that the lemon in the marinade gave to the chicken. I offer the following tips when cooking kebabs on the grill:
--I always use metal skewers. It seems that no matter how long I soak wooden skewers in water, they still burn and catch on fire.
--I like to use a kebab grill to hold the skewers instead of putting the kebabs directly on the barbecue grill. I feel that I can control the cooking of the kebabs better with less burning.


Those kebabs look amazing.  Thanks for the tip -- I think I have a kebab rack somewhere and I need to go find it. : )

 

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#111 [url]

Aug 25 16 3:35 AM

The recipe I chose for this challenge is http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/other-main-course/greek-souvlakia.html?p=338 by Daily Inspiration!!  I cooked it on our Weber charcoal grill.

image

Tips:
1.  For beginner charcoal grillers, make sure to pour on the lighter fluid (if not using instant light) and then let it absorb into the charcoal for about 5 minutes before igniting it.   Then allow the flames to die down and wait for the charcoal to turn to red/ash color before adding any foods.

2. Most items that are grilled, will be directly over the hot coals to get a sear/grill marks and then moved to indirect heat to cook through to desired doneness, so make sure to arrange your charcoal pile to allow for this, but change placement each time(left, right, front, back of grill) so as not to always have the high heat/charcoals in only one area of the grill each time.

3.  Make sure vents are open when starting your charcoal to allow for high heat.  Can later partially close vents for slower cooked items.  When done, close all vents to stop the charcoals from burning, then can use the leftovers to help start next grilling.


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#112 [url]

Aug 25 16 3:44 AM

image

For my team, I made:

Greeker Than Greek Grilled Greek Chicken by ForeverMama

http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greeker-than-greek-grilled-greek-chicken-19478

First of all, I used thin-sliced chicken breasts, since they cook up really quick on the grill.  I find, when grilling chicken, that it can be a bit dicey to figure out when they are cooked through, so I recommend using thin-sliced breasts, if that is to your taste.  I used a gas grill, and I also recommend oiling it very well before cooking to ensure your food does not stick to the grill (although apparently, from my photo, I did not oil as well as I should have because one piece of chicken did stick a little).  Another tip I have is to not crowed the food on the grill, but to space it generously so everything cooks evenly and food is easy to flip over.

image


image




 

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#113 [url]

Aug 25 16 5:19 AM

Diner524 wrote:
The recipe I chose for this challenge is http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/other-main-course/greek-souvlakia.html?p=338 by Daily Inspiration!!  I cooked it on our Weber charcoal grill.

image

Tips:
1.  For beginner charcoal grillers, make sure to pour on the lighter fluid (if not using instant light) and then let it absorb into the charcoal for about 5 minutes before igniting it.   Then allow the flames to die down and wait for the charcoal to turn to red/ash color before adding any foods.

2. Most items that are grilled, will be directly over the hot coals to get a sear/grill marks and then moved to indirect heat to cook through to desired doneness, so make sure to arrange your charcoal pile to allow for this, but change placement each time(left, right, front, back of grill) so as not to always have the high heat/charcoals in only one area of the grill each time.

3.  Make sure vents are open when starting your charcoal to allow for high heat.  Can later partially close vents for slower cooked items.  When done, close all vents to stop the charcoals from burning, then can use the leftovers to help start next grilling.


Your souvlakia looks wonderful.  Thanks for the awesome photo and tips/techniques. : )

 

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#114 [url]

Aug 25 16 5:21 AM

JackieOhNo wrote:
image

For my team, I made:

Greeker Than Greek Grilled Greek Chicken by ForeverMama

http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/greeker-than-greek-grilled-greek-chicken-19478

First of all, I used thin-sliced chicken breasts, since they cook up really quick on the grill.  I find, when grilling chicken, that it can be a bit dicey to figure out when they are cooked through, so I recommend using thin-sliced breasts, if that is to your taste.  I used a gas grill, and I also recommend oiling it very well before cooking to ensure your food does not stick to the grill (although apparently, from my photo, I did not oil as well as I should have because one piece of chicken did stick a little).  Another tip I have is to not crowed the food on the grill, but to space it generously so everything cooks evenly and food is easy to flip over.

image


image





 


Looks delish - thank you so much for sharing your grilling tips. : )

 

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#116 [url]

Aug 25 16 8:33 PM

I know I've stepped back from this challenge already, but our team needs another one who does it, so I thought hard how to manage it. And I remembered that many years ago, DH purchased a one-way-grill which we wanted to use for a day-trip by bicycle. We never did it, and that thing still sat in the basement waiting for use.
It's a thingy like this one: https://www.amazon.de/Activa-10050-Einweggrill/dp/B006J3RIPW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1472130645&sr=8-9&keywords=Einmalgrill
We found it in the Netherlands, back then, and now I used it to make diner's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html?p=1 
It did work - a very rustic method, but with fire and charcoal.
The grill had a firing agent which I did not use because I don't trust that stuff... don't want it near my food. So I heated the charcoal in the small clay oven which we have on the terrace (which usually is for warming when it's a bit cool outside), then got it out with the small shovel we usually use for our fireplace inside the house, and put the charcoal into the grill thingy (sorry - I don't know how this aluminum pan is called in English!), covered it with the oiled grate (a *very* fragile thing, but it worked), waited until I thought the heat was low enough so that the meat would not burn immediately (the charcoal is very, very close to the grate and the meat) and then went ahead and grilled the meat like the recipe description says.
I have to say that it does taste quite smokey with this kind if grill, but I also have to admit that I am totally new to grilling. usually DH was our grill-master, but since he's ill, he doesn't do it, so I tried it and dan honestly say it was a very exciting experience image
For heating the charcoal, I burned some paper and wood shavings, then put the charcoal on top and waited until it was red hot.
When I looked for the picture of the grill online, I found it on amazon with some quite enthusiastic reviews and comments, but I have to say that it really is more kind of a makeshift. But it definitely gets meat done, and it is fun, and it's authentic because it's grilling on real fire ;-)
I had a lot of fun doing this.

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#117 [url]

Aug 25 16 9:18 PM

Mia in Germany wrote:
I know I've stepped back from this challenge already, but our team needs another one who does it, so I thought hard how to manage it. And I remembered that many years ago, DH purchased a one-way-grill which we wanted to use for a day-trip by bicycle. We never did it, and that thing still sat in the basement waiting for use.
It's a thingy like this one: https://www.amazon.de/Activa-10050-Einweggrill/dp/B006J3RIPW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1472130645&sr=8-9&keywords=Einmalgrill
We found it in the Netherlands, back then, and now I used it to make diner's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html?p=1 
It did work - a very rustic method, but with fire and charcoal.
The grill had a firing agent which I did not use because I don't trust that stuff... don't want it near my food. So I heated the charcoal in the small clay oven which we have on the terrace (which usually is for warming when it's a bit cool outside), then got it out with the small shovel we usually use for our fireplace inside the house, and put the charcoal into the grill thingy (sorry - I don't know how this aluminum pan is called in English!), covered it with the oiled grate (a *very* fragile thing, but it worked), waited until I thought the heat was low enough so that the meat would not burn immediately (the charcoal is very, very close to the grate and the meat) and then went ahead and grilled the meat like the recipe description says.
I have to say that it does taste quite smokey with this kind if grill, but I also have to admit that I am totally new to grilling. usually DH was our grill-master, but since he's ill, he doesn't do it, so I tried it and dan honestly say it was a very exciting experience image
For heating the charcoal, I burned some paper and wood shavings, then put the charcoal on top and waited until it was red hot.
When I looked for the picture of the grill online, I found it on amazon with some quite enthusiastic reviews and comments, but I have to say that it really is more kind of a makeshift. But it definitely gets meat done, and it is fun, and it's authentic because it's grilling on real fire ;-)
I had a lot of fun doing this.


Hi Mia,

Sooo happy that your portable grill finally found a use.  As long as there was charcoal and a flame -- it works. : )

Glad you enjoyed these chicken kebabs.

Hugs,

Quote    Reply   

#119 [url]

Aug 25 16 11:50 PM

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Mia in Germany wrote:
I know I've stepped back from this challenge already, but our team needs another one who does it, so I thought hard how to manage it. And I remembered that many years ago, DH purchased a one-way-grill which we wanted to use for a day-trip by bicycle. We never did it, and that thing still sat in the basement waiting for use.
It's a thingy like this one: https://www.amazon.de/Activa-10050-Einweggrill/dp/B006J3RIPW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1472130645&sr=8-9&keywords=Einmalgrill
We found it in the Netherlands, back then, and now I used it to make diner's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html?p=1 
It did work - a very rustic method, but with fire and charcoal.
The grill had a firing agent which I did not use because I don't trust that stuff... don't want it near my food. So I heated the charcoal in the small clay oven which we have on the terrace (which usually is for warming when it's a bit cool outside), then got it out with the small shovel we usually use for our fireplace inside the house, and put the charcoal into the grill thingy (sorry - I don't know how this aluminum pan is called in English!), covered it with the oiled grate (a *very* fragile thing, but it worked), waited until I thought the heat was low enough so that the meat would not burn immediately (the charcoal is very, very close to the grate and the meat) and then went ahead and grilled the meat like the recipe description says.
I have to say that it does taste quite smokey with this kind if grill, but I also have to admit that I am totally new to grilling. usually DH was our grill-master, but since he's ill, he doesn't do it, so I tried it and dan honestly say it was a very exciting experience image
For heating the charcoal, I burned some paper and wood shavings, then put the charcoal on top and waited until it was red hot.
When I looked for the picture of the grill online, I found it on amazon with some quite enthusiastic reviews and comments, but I have to say that it really is more kind of a makeshift. But it definitely gets meat done, and it is fun, and it's authentic because it's grilling on real fire ;-)
I had a lot of fun doing this.


Hi Mia,

Sooo happy that your portable grill finally found a use.  As long as there was charcoal and a flame -- it works. : )

Glad you enjoyed these chicken kebabs.

Hugs,

image
I've eyed that thing for about four years, then forgot it, and now luckily remembered it LOL Believe me, there was a lot of fire on a hot day imageThe neighbours must have thought I'm totally out of my rocker.

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#120 [url]

Aug 26 16 7:41 AM

Mia in Germany wrote:

Nancys Pantry wrote:

Mia in Germany wrote:
I know I've stepped back from this challenge already, but our team needs another one who does it, so I thought hard how to manage it. And I remembered that many years ago, DH purchased a one-way-grill which we wanted to use for a day-trip by bicycle. We never did it, and that thing still sat in the basement waiting for use.
It's a thingy like this one: https://www.amazon.de/Activa-10050-Einweggrill/dp/B006J3RIPW/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1472130645&sr=8-9&keywords=Einmalgrill
We found it in the Netherlands, back then, and now I used it to make diner's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/main-course-chicken/chicken-souvlaki-kebabs.html?p=1 
It did work - a very rustic method, but with fire and charcoal.
The grill had a firing agent which I did not use because I don't trust that stuff... don't want it near my food. So I heated the charcoal in the small clay oven which we have on the terrace (which usually is for warming when it's a bit cool outside), then got it out with the small shovel we usually use for our fireplace inside the house, and put the charcoal into the grill thingy (sorry - I don't know how this aluminum pan is called in English!), covered it with the oiled grate (a *very* fragile thing, but it worked), waited until I thought the heat was low enough so that the meat would not burn immediately (the charcoal is very, very close to the grate and the meat) and then went ahead and grilled the meat like the recipe description says.
I have to say that it does taste quite smokey with this kind if grill, but I also have to admit that I am totally new to grilling. usually DH was our grill-master, but since he's ill, he doesn't do it, so I tried it and dan honestly say it was a very exciting experience image
For heating the charcoal, I burned some paper and wood shavings, then put the charcoal on top and waited until it was red hot.
When I looked for the picture of the grill online, I found it on amazon with some quite enthusiastic reviews and comments, but I have to say that it really is more kind of a makeshift. But it definitely gets meat done, and it is fun, and it's authentic because it's grilling on real fire ;-)
I had a lot of fun doing this.


Hi Mia,

Sooo happy that your portable grill finally found a use.  As long as there was charcoal and a flame -- it works. : )

Glad you enjoyed these chicken kebabs.

Hugs,

image
I've eyed that thing for about four years, then forgot it, and now luckily remembered it LOL Believe me, there was a lot of fire on a hot day imageThe neighbours must have thought I'm totally out of my rocker.


image

 

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