#61 [url]

Aug 20 16 11:05 AM

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Sisters of the Traveling Pans
Lauralie51


Waldorf or Wedge - Tale of 2 Oscars


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In 1830 John Del-Monico, a retired sea captain, and his brother Peter, a candy maker and pastry chef, came to New York with a combined savings of $20,000 and desire to open a business. They invested in a small cafe and pastry shop at 23 William Street which they called Delmonico and Brother. Historical records indicate that this was the first rstaurant or public dining room in the United States. After changing the spelling of their last name to Delmonico the restaurant had great success and a culinary legend was born. Unfortunately because of Prohibition in the early 1920's the Delmonico family sold their business interests away. 


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In 1927 Oscar Tucci reopened Delmonico's popularly called "Oscar's Delmonico" at the old restaurant at 2 South William Street in New York. Tucci used the original menus, recipes and created the famous Wedge Salad. Oscar's Delmonico became distinguished in its own right continuing to attract prominent politicians and celebrities. The Tucci legacy continued in Greenwich, CT when Mario Tucci, son of Oscar, opened Delmonico's in 1986.


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Delmonico's has had their wedge salad, which is called Oscar's BLT Salad, on the menu for over 50 years. Today it is served with Bayley Hazen Blue and pickled onions and a price of $14.

We enjoyed this wedge salad - http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=26 by Mikekey 

Last Edited By: Lauralie51 Aug 21 16 12:07 PM. Edited 6 times.

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#62 [url]

Aug 21 16 5:17 AM

I decided to make the wedge salad and used Mikekey's recipe for http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html.
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1.  I found this to be interesting, especially with how this has taken 180 degree turn over the 30+ years.  "On November 15, 1897, the new Delmonico's Restaurant on 44th Street opened to universal praise and some shock.  In the restaurant, smoking would now be permitted (previously, smoking had been permitted only in the cafe).  This change was at the insistence of women, who resented the fact that the men would "retire to the smoking room" after dinner.  With this change, women believed that the men would be averse to desert them after dining."

2.  "In 1895, Young Charles Delmonico and Ranhofer introduced New York (via the Delmonico Restaurant) to the "alligator pear." or avocado, which had been newly imported from South America.  Ranhofer had known of the avocado -- he mentions the avocado in his book, 
The Epicurean,
=19.2pxwhich he published the previous year -- but until 1895 he had been unable to secure a supply of the buttery fruit.

3.  "On July 7, 1891, the new Delmonico's Restaurant at South William Street opened to the public.  The new structure was eight stories tall and featured, for the first time, electric lights.  It also kept several touches from the original structure, including the Pompeii pillars and cornice that framed the entrance."

All information qouted about Delmonico's was from 
 -  http://www.steakperfection.com/delmonico/History.html.


Last Edited By: Diner524 Aug 23 16 3:35 AM. Edited 3 times.

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#63 [url]

Aug 22 16 12:06 AM

Lauralie51 wrote:
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Sisters of the Traveling Pans
Lauralie51


Waldorf or Wedge - Tale of 2 Oscars


image


In 1830 John Del-Monico, a retired sea captain, and his brother Peter, a candy maker and pastry chef, came to New York with a combined savings of $20,000 and desire to open a business. They invested in a small cafe and pastry shop at 23 William Street which they called Delmonico and Brother. Historical records indicate that this was the first rstaurant or public dining room in the United States. After changing the spelling of their last name to Delmonico the restaurant had great success and a culinary legend was born. Unfortunately because of Prohibition in the early 1920's the Delmonico family sold their business interests away. 


image


In 1927 Oscar Tucci reopened Delmonico's popularly called "Oscar's Delmonico" at the old restaurant at 2 South William Street in New York. Tucci used the original menus, recipes and created the famous Wedge Salad. Oscar's Delmonico became distinguished in its own right continuing to attract prominent politicians and celebrities. The Tucci legacy continued in Greenwich, CT when Mario Tucci, son of Oscar, opened Delmonico's in 1986.


image


Delmonico's has had their wedge salad, which is called Oscar's BLT Salad, on the menu for over 50 years. Today it is served with Bayley Hazen Blue and pickled onions and a price of $14.

We enjoyed this wedge salad - http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=26 by Mikekey 


1830 was a long time ago! Thanks for the history lesson Lori! 

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#64 [url]

Aug 22 16 12:09 AM

Linky wrote:
MERPed Mikekey's recipe: http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/iceberg-wedge-salad-with-strawberries.html
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Factoid #1 -  The original Delmonico’s offered a new novelty in dining, including the Parisian "bill of fare", or a carte, (which today we call a menu) instead of a price fix meal. Modern-day Delmonico's has the largest restaruant wine cellar in the world.

Factoid #2 - According to a Tanimura and Antile, California Lettuce Growers, there is a different history of our chosen topic: 
"What About The Wedge?
   While there don’t seem to be any claimants (hotels, chefs or restaurants) to the
invention of the classic American Iceberg Wedge Salad, the general consensus places
it as a ubiquitous menu entry of the 1950’s and 1960’s.
   After a brief decline in popularity in the 1970’s and 1980’s, the Iceberg Wedge Salad is
enjoying a retro rebirth on trendy menus.
   Steakhouses refuse to give it up; it remains a popular mainstay offering at
steakhouses across the U.S.
   New popular toppings include Maytag bleu cheese, chunky feta, avocados, bacon, and
nuts."

Factoid #3 - In 1941 at Oscar's Delmonico at 56 Beaver Street the menu included the following:
The Delmonico Steak was $1.35
Chicken with Rice was $1.00
Broiled French Lamb Chops were .95 cents
Chicken Salad was $1.15
Whole Cold Lobster Salad was $1.50, the most expensive item on the menu
Coffee was .20 cents
Tea was .20 cents
Spumoni was .30 cents
Slice of Boston Cream Pie was.25 cents 


Can you imagine buying a steak for $1.35? image

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#66 [url]

Aug 22 16 5:48 AM

Susie D wrote:

Lauralie51 wrote:
image

Sisters of the Traveling Pans
Lauralie51


Waldorf or Wedge - Tale of 2 Oscars


image


In 1830 John Del-Monico, a retired sea captain, and his brother Peter, a candy maker and pastry chef, came to New York with a combined savings of $20,000 and desire to open a business. They invested in a small cafe and pastry shop at 23 William Street which they called Delmonico and Brother. Historical records indicate that this was the first rstaurant or public dining room in the United States. After changing the spelling of their last name to Delmonico the restaurant had great success and a culinary legend was born. Unfortunately because of Prohibition in the early 1920's the Delmonico family sold their business interests away. 


image


In 1927 Oscar Tucci reopened Delmonico's popularly called "Oscar's Delmonico" at the old restaurant at 2 South William Street in New York. Tucci used the original menus, recipes and created the famous Wedge Salad. Oscar's Delmonico became distinguished in its own right continuing to attract prominent politicians and celebrities. The Tucci legacy continued in Greenwich, CT when Mario Tucci, son of Oscar, opened Delmonico's in 1986.


image


Delmonico's has had their wedge salad, which is called Oscar's BLT Salad, on the menu for over 50 years. Today it is served with Bayley Hazen Blue and pickled onions and a price of $14.

We enjoyed this wedge salad - http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=26 by Mikekey 


1830 was a long time ago! Thanks for the history lesson Lori! 

yes it was! thank goodness kitchens have progressed along the way. 

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#67 [url]

Aug 24 16 10:33 AM

I chose Mikekey's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=1 for this challenge.

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From the very beginning, in 1827, the Delmonico brothers operated their restaurant with a policy of using only the very best foods prepared in the very best manner.  Quality and not cost was their emphasis.

In 1834, the brothers used some of their growing profits to purchase a 220 acre farm on Long Island.  (Later, in 1855, the farm was incorporated into Brooklyn.)  The brothers not only maintained a country residence at the farm but they also used the farm for great benefit to grow vegetables for their restaurant.  At the farm, the brothers raised many vegetables that were not otherwise available in America.  They introduced many of these to their American restaurant guests.

The authentic Delmonico’s Restaurant continued for many years and finally closed in 1923 when the owner at that time realized it could not be successful during Prohibition.  In 1929, shortly before the Wall Street Crash, Oscar Tucci opened the Delmonico’s South William Street building as a restaurant, which he called Delmonico's Restaurant but which the public knew as "Oscar's Delmonico's".

The Tucci era produced three of the most prominent restaurateurs of the twentieth century: Sirio Maccioni of Le Cirque fame, Tony May of San Domenico and Rainbow Room fame, and Harry Poulakakos of Harry at Hanover Square. Tucci invented the Wedge Salad which is known worldwide.

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#68 [url]

Aug 24 16 8:04 PM

For the gift shop, I chose to make a "wedge" salad.

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html


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I really enjoyed reading about the history of this salad and the restaurant which created it. 

Interesting Facts:

Delmonico's is credited with being the first American restaurant to allow patrons to order from a menu a la carte, as opposed to table d' hote.  And, the restaurant is the birthplace of the widely imitated Delmonico steak.

In 1927, Oscar Tucci, restauranteur purchased the entire 70,000 square foot building located at 56 Beaver Street.  He first opened it as a "speakeasy" in 1933, after the repeal of prohibition  and later opened Oscar's Delmonico.

Signature dishes include Delmonico Potatoes, but the most famous dish is the Delmonico steak.  It is also thought that eggs benedict, Manhattan clam chowder and Lobster Newburg were also created by this restaurant.


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Delmonico Restaurant at 56 Beaver Street

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Mario Tucci, Oscar Tucci and Mary Tucci

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#69 [url]

Aug 24 16 8:42 PM

PanNan wrote:
I chose Mikekey's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=1 for this challenge.

image

From the very beginning, in 1827, the Delmonico brothers operated their restaurant with a policy of using only the very best foods prepared in the very best manner.  Quality and not cost was their emphasis.

In 1834, the brothers used some of their growing profits to purchase a 220 acre farm on Long Island.  (Later, in 1855, the farm was incorporated into Brooklyn.)  The brothers not only maintained a country residence at the farm but they also used the farm for great benefit to grow vegetables for their restaurant.  At the farm, the brothers raised many vegetables that were not otherwise available in America.  They introduced many of these to their American restaurant guests.

The authentic Delmonico’s Restaurant continued for many years and finally closed in 1923 when the owner at that time realized it could not be successful during Prohibition.  In 1929, shortly before the Wall Street Crash, Oscar Tucci opened the Delmonico’s South William Street building as a restaurant, which he called Delmonico's Restaurant but which the public knew as "Oscar's Delmonico's".

The Tucci era produced three of the most prominent restaurateurs of the twentieth century: Sirio Maccioni of Le Cirque fame, Tony May of San Domenico and Rainbow Room fame, and Harry Poulakakos of Harry at Hanover Square. Tucci invented the Wedge Salad which is known worldwide.



That salad looks good, PanNan.  I'll get your completion noted on Page 1.

  Northwestgal

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#70 [url]

Aug 24 16 8:48 PM

Nancys Pantry wrote:
For the gift shop, I chose to make a "wedge" salad.

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html


image


I really enjoyed reading about the history of this salad and the restaurant which created it. 

Interesting Facts:

Delmonico's is credited with being the first American restaurant to allow patrons to order from a menu a la carte, as opposed to table d' hote.  And, the restaurant is the birthplace of the widely imitated Delmonico steak.

In 1927, Oscar Tucci, restauranteur purchased the entire 70,000 square foot building located at 56 Beaver Street.  He first opened it as a "speakeasy" in 1933, after the repeal of prohibition  and later opened Oscar's Delmonico.

Signature dishes include Delmonico Potatoes, but the most famous dish is the Delmonico steak.  It is also thought that eggs benedict, Manhattan clam chowder and Lobster Newburg were also created by this restaurant.


image


Delmonico Restaurant at 56 Beaver Street

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Mario Tucci, Oscar Tucci and Mary Tucci


Your salad looks so scrumptious, Nancy.  I'm suddenly craving a healthy tossed green salad now.  I'll get your completion noted on Page 1.  I'm really enjoying learning so much about some of New York's most famous restaurants.  Thanks for the interesting facts you provided.

  Northwestgal

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#71 [url]

Aug 25 16 1:31 PM

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For this challenge, I've chosen to go with the wedgie.  Oops, I mean Wedge!  I've made and reviewed  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=26 by Mikekey.

Being one of the last to report completion, many of the fun facts surrounding wedge salads have already been put forth. But nevertheless, there are some things you may not know, relating to salads, wedge salads, and Delmonico's!

1. Oscar Tucci established traditions that spread throughout the restaurant industry as a whole, and even throughout popular culture. For instance, it was Oscar's Delmonico that came up with the term "86", as in "to drop something". If a restaurant runs out of a menu item it is said to be "86'ed". The story goes like this: Menu item 86 was very popular and it often would run out. So the term "86" became slang for "we're out of that". Within a short period of time, all the restaurants in NYC had adopted the term, and it spread out to the reest of the world from there. The term even took on other linguistic uses, such as "86 that", whih means to stop doing or saying something.
 
2. Another interesting thing I found is that many dishes are said to have been invented at Delmonico's, but other places claim them, too!  Among those dishes are:  Chicken a la King (aka Chicken a la Keene), Eggs Benedict, Baked Alaska, Oysters Rockefeller, Lobster Newberg, and Manhattan Clam Chowder.

3. Oscar Tucci was originally from Florence, Italy. 

I found it interesting that the word "salad" comes from the Latin word for salt ("sal"). In Roman times, salads consisted mostly of salted vegetables glazed with an oil and vinegar dressing. The French eventually coined the term "salade", which is where our term "salad" comes from.

I really loved the dressing on the Wedge Salad made for this challenge. And it was pretty, too! Next time, I may go with Oscar's idea and add bacon, as well!

image


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#72 [url]

Aug 26 16 5:37 AM

JostLori wrote:
image
For this challenge, I've chosen to go with the wedgie.  Oops, I mean Wedge!  I've made and reviewed  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html?p=26 by Mikekey.

Being one of the last to report completion, many of the fun facts surrounding wedge salads have already been put forth. But nevertheless, there are some things you may not know, relating to salads, wedge salads, and Delmonico's!

1. Oscar Tucci established traditions that spread throughout the restaurant industry as a whole, and even throughout popular culture. For instance, it was Oscar's Delmonico that came up with the term "86", as in "to drop something". If a restaurant runs out of a menu item it is said to be "86'ed". The story goes like this: Menu item 86 was very popular and it often would run out. So the term "86" became slang for "we're out of that". Within a short period of time, all the restaurants in NYC had adopted the term, and it spread out to the reest of the world from there. The term even took on other linguistic uses, such as "86 that", whih means to stop doing or saying something.
 
2. Another interesting thing I found is that many dishes are said to have been invented at Delmonico's, but other places claim them, too!  Among those dishes are:  Chicken a la King (aka Chicken a la Keene), Eggs Benedict, Baked Alaska, Oysters Rockefeller, Lobster Newberg, and Manhattan Clam Chowder.

3. Oscar Tucci was originally from Florence, Italy. 

I found it interesting that the word "salad" comes from the Latin word for salt ("sal"). In Roman times, salads consisted mostly of salted vegetables glazed with an oil and vinegar dressing. The French eventually coined the term "salade", which is where our term "salad" comes from.

I really loved the dressing on the Wedge Salad made for this challenge. And it was pretty, too! Next time, I may go with Oscar's idea and add bacon, as well!

image



I've got your scrumptious completion noted on Page 1, JostLori.

  Northwestgal

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#73 [url]

Aug 26 16 9:11 AM

I chose the Waldorf salad and made:

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Classic Waldorf Salad

Even though Oscar Tschirky was never an actual chef, although he is credited with creating many famous dishes, his farm in upstate New Paltz later was operated as a home for retired chefs.

Oscar played himself in one of those news shorts in 1933, titled, "Repeal Brings Wet Flood!"  I don't know exactly what that means, but the newsreel can be seen on the Warner DVD of "The Little Giant" (1933).

During his lifetime, Oscar collected restaurant menus.  Cornell University is in possession of his collection and they have been adding to it.  Their collection now numbers more than 10,000.

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