#43 [url]

Aug 15 16 9:49 AM

I made http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/fruit-salad/waldorf-salad-12.html by lazyme 

The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Built in 1893 and expanded in 1897, the Waldorf–Astoria was razed in 1929 to make way for construction of the Empire State Building. 
Its successor, the current Waldorf Astoria New York, was built on Park Avenue in 1931.


image 
On the right hand side of this photo are the residences of John Jacob and William B. Astor. (aka the fueding relatives)
William Astor, motivated in part by a dispute with his aunt Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor, built the Waldorf Hotel next door to her house, on the site of his father's mansion at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street. 

Early on, the Waldorf was a laughing stock with its large number of bathrooms and was known briefly as  "Astor's Folly" with the general perception of the palatial hotel being that it had no place in New York City.It appeared destined for failure. Wealthy New Yorkers were angry because they viewed the construction of the hotel as the ruination of a good neighborhood. Business travelers found it too expensive and too far uptown for their needs.

Did you know? 

The hotel was also influential in advancing the status of women, who were admitted singly without escorts. Boldt's wife, Louise, was influential in evolving the idea of the grand urban hotel as a social center, particularly in making it appealing to women as a venue for social events, or just to be seen in the Peacock Alley. The combined hotel was the first to do away with a ladies-only parlor and provided women with a place to play billiards and ping-pong. It was the first New York hotel to allocate an entire room for afternoon tea. The teas began in the Waldorf Garden with attendance eventually being so large, both the Empire Room and at times, the Rose Room, had to be opened during the hours of four and six pm to accommodate the number of guests. Men were admitted to the teas only if they were in the company of a woman

 The United States Senate inquiry into the sinking of the RMS Titanic was opened at the hotel on April 19, 1912 before moving on to Washington, D.C.  John Jacob Astor IV was one of the people who perished on its ill-fated journey.

Quote    Reply   

#45 [url]

Aug 15 16 12:11 PM

Stacy G from the Sisters of Pans reporting on the wedge salad!
I MERP'd for this challenge

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html by Miss Lazyme and it was awesome!!!

image


Here's some more fun facts about Delmonicos!

Dishes invented at Delmonico's include Baked Alaska, Delmonico Potatoes, Delmonico Steak, Eggs Benedict and Lobster Newburg. While Delmonico's is sometimes credited as well with inventing Oysters Rockefeller, that dish was actually created in New Orleans: what Delmonico's did was introduce it to New York.  

 1897 -- On 15 November The restaurant allowed smoking in the dining rooms. This was seen as a victory for women, because men would no longer have an excuse to abandon them at the table after dinner to retire to the smoking room. 

  From 1836 to 1863, there was no central bank in America to issue money. Businesses, states and cities issued their own. During the civil war, even Delmonico's issued their own paper currency; it was accepted as good at many places other than just Delmonico's.image

Mark Twains' 70th birthday was celebrated in 1905 in a private banquet room at the 44th Street Delmonico's. Among the 150 people present were Andrew Carnegie, Emily Post and Mrs. Wilson Woodrow.
image

And while not part of the challenge I would like to share my passion for Iceberg lettuce!  Okay maybe not a passion, but it's just got such a great crunch and is such a great base for a fabulous dressing!  

image

MYTH: Iceberg lettuce has no nutrients
FACT: It has plenty of good-for-you compounds Just because darker varieties have a few more is no reason to banish it! Iceberg also: Boosts bones
Just 1 cup of shredded iceberg lettuce delivers nearly 20% of your daily dose of vitamin K, a nutrient many women don't get enough of. When Harvard University researchers tracked the diets of more than 72,000 women, those who ate one or more servings a day of any type of lettuce (they're all rich in the vitamin) had the lowest rates of hip fracture. (Here are 12 ways to get break-proof bones for life.)[b]Protects your sight[/b]
Iceberg lettuce is a good source of vitamin A (just 1 cup supplies 15% of your daily dose), needed to keep your vision sharp. [b]Inches you toward "five-a-day"[/b]

If iceberg is your favorite lettuce, don't hesitate to use it as the base of a tossed salad. "Any lettuce that keeps you eating salads is a great vehicle for getting more produce into your day," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Remember: Even the most nutrient-rich lettuce does you no good if it ends up in the trash. 

[b]Try it:[/b] Grilled! For a unique, smoky flavor, halve or quarter a head of lettuce and grill just long enough for the telltale marks to form (about 4 to 5 minutes). Remove from heat, core, chop, and dress. 

 image

Quote    Reply   

#46 [url]

Aug 15 16 6:50 PM

For the Sister team, I have made and enjoyed: http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/fruit-salad/waldorf-salad-12.html#page1:comment2165674 by lazyme   AND learned some interesting facts about the Waldorf Salad creator. 

Let me tell you a little about a man named, Oscar Tschirky. 
image



What? You haven't heard of him? Why, he is the famed "Oscar of the Waldorf". Hmmm..."Waldorf", you say? "That sounds like a salad."  Bingo! Oscar is the man who is credited with creating THE Waldorf Salad. Oscar was the maitre d'hotel of the Waldorf Hotel in Manhattan, NYC, from the opening day of the hotel, in 1893, until he retired in 1943. It is said that Oscar created the Waldorf Salad for a society supper during the hotel opening. Here is his recipe for the famous salad:
"Waldorf Salad: Peel two raw apple and cut them into small pieces, say about half an inch square, also cut some celery the same way, and mix it with the apple. Be very careful not to let any seeds of the apples be mixed with it. The salad must be dressed with a good mayonnaise." That's it! Did you notice that there are no walnuts in his recipe? Oscar created a cookbook called, "The Cook Book by "Oscar" of the Waldorf" and, of course, included the Waldorf Salad recipe. 
image

Although Oscar wasn't a chef, he was well-respected for his culinary skills and taste. In addition to the Waldorf Salad, he also is said to have created Veal Oscar and Egg Benedict. 

Oscar's reputation was so well known that it was considered a privilege to meet him. For example: One time Oscar was introduced to one of the most prestigious railroad men of the time, who said, "I had rather meet that man than nine out of 10 of your so-called big men either here or in Washington.".
Oscar really paved the way for the current standards of hotel service by his dedication to every task he took as a maitre d'hotel at the Waldorf Astoria. 
Interestingly, he never saw the need for that maitre d'hotel title. He just called himself a "hotel man", and his assistants were called assistants to Oscar. He kept the Waldorf running with perfection - from welcoming guests at the door, checking them into the hotel, ordering dinners, attending the dinners, getting carriages, ordering theatre tickets, etc.... all the way to waving goodbye at checkout and giving a blessing as guests leave. 

I'll leave you with one more interesting fact about our man Oscar. He collected menus as a hobby. After his death, his collected menus, papers and personal memorabilia were donated to Cornell University. Cool!


image

Quote    Reply   

#47 [url]

Aug 15 16 8:10 PM

Susie D wrote:
I made http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/fruit-salad/waldorf-salad-12.html by lazyme 

The Waldorf–Astoria originated as two hotels, built side-by-side by feuding relatives on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Built in 1893 and expanded in 1897, the Waldorf–Astoria was razed in 1929 to make way for construction of the Empire State Building. 
Its successor, the current Waldorf Astoria New York, was built on Park Avenue in 1931.


image 
On the right hand side of this photo are the residences of John Jacob and William B. Astor. (aka the fueding relatives)
William Astor, motivated in part by a dispute with his aunt Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor, built the Waldorf Hotel next door to her house, on the site of his father's mansion at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street. 

Early on, the Waldorf was a laughing stock with its large number of bathrooms and was known briefly as  "Astor's Folly" with the general perception of the palatial hotel being that it had no place in New York City.It appeared destined for failure. Wealthy New Yorkers were angry because they viewed the construction of the hotel as the ruination of a good neighborhood. Business travelers found it too expensive and too far uptown for their needs.

Did you know? 

The hotel was also influential in advancing the status of women, who were admitted singly without escorts. Boldt's wife, Louise, was influential in evolving the idea of the grand urban hotel as a social center, particularly in making it appealing to women as a venue for social events, or just to be seen in the Peacock Alley. The combined hotel was the first to do away with a ladies-only parlor and provided women with a place to play billiards and ping-pong. It was the first New York hotel to allocate an entire room for afternoon tea. The teas began in the Waldorf Garden with attendance eventually being so large, both the Empire Room and at times, the Rose Room, had to be opened during the hours of four and six pm to accommodate the number of guests. Men were admitted to the teas only if they were in the company of a woman

 The United States Senate inquiry into the sinking of the RMS Titanic was opened at the hotel on April 19, 1912 before moving on to Washington, D.C.  John Jacob Astor IV was one of the people who perished on its ill-fated journey.


That's very informative, Susie.  I knew John Astor was one of those who didn't survive the Titanic sinking, but I didn't know much about the history of the Waldorf.  I learned a lot!  It's interesting to discover it wasn't appreciated when it was built and yet it wenton to be such a popular hotel.

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#48 [url]

Aug 15 16 8:18 PM

Stacy G wrote:
Stacy G from the Sisters of Pans reporting on the wedge salad!
I MERP'd for this challenge

http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html by Miss Lazyme and it was awesome!!!

image


Here's some more fun facts about Delmonicos!

Dishes invented at Delmonico's include Baked Alaska, Delmonico Potatoes, Delmonico Steak, Eggs Benedict and Lobster Newburg. While Delmonico's is sometimes credited as well with inventing Oysters Rockefeller, that dish was actually created in New Orleans: what Delmonico's did was introduce it to New York.  

 1897 -- On 15 November The restaurant allowed smoking in the dining rooms. This was seen as a victory for women, because men would no longer have an excuse to abandon them at the table after dinner to retire to the smoking room. 

  From 1836 to 1863, there was no central bank in America to issue money. Businesses, states and cities issued their own. During the civil war, even Delmonico's issued their own paper currency; it was accepted as good at many places other than just Delmonico's.image

Mark Twains' 70th birthday was celebrated in 1905 in a private banquet room at the 44th Street Delmonico's. Among the 150 people present were Andrew Carnegie, Emily Post and Mrs. Wilson Woodrow.
image

And while not part of the challenge I would like to share my passion for Iceberg lettuce!  Okay maybe not a passion, but it's just got such a great crunch and is such a great base for a fabulous dressing!  

image

MYTH: Iceberg lettuce has no nutrients
FACT: It has plenty of good-for-you compounds Just because darker varieties have a few more is no reason to banish it! Iceberg also: Boosts bones
Just 1 cup of shredded iceberg lettuce delivers nearly 20% of your daily dose of vitamin K, a nutrient many women don't get enough of. When Harvard University researchers tracked the diets of more than 72,000 women, those who ate one or more servings a day of any type of lettuce (they're all rich in the vitamin) had the lowest rates of hip fracture. (Here are 12 ways to get break-proof bones for life.)[b]Protects your sight[/b]
Iceberg lettuce is a good source of vitamin A (just 1 cup supplies 15% of your daily dose), needed to keep your vision sharp. [b]Inches you toward "five-a-day"[/b]

If iceberg is your favorite lettuce, don't hesitate to use it as the base of a tossed salad. "Any lettuce that keeps you eating salads is a great vehicle for getting more produce into your day," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Remember: Even the most nutrient-rich lettuce does you no good if it ends up in the trash. 

[b]Try it:[/b] Grilled! For a unique, smoky flavor, halve or quarter a head of lettuce and grill just long enough for the telltale marks to form (about 4 to 5 minutes). Remove from heat, core, chop, and dress. 

 image


Stacy, your photo is lovely.  And I learned a lot from your introduction of Demonico's.  I'm going to try grilling lettuce this summer, it sounds delicious.

I'll get your completion noted on Page 1.

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#49 [url]

Aug 15 16 8:22 PM

LifeIsGood wrote:
For the Sister team, I have made and enjoyed: http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/fruit-salad/waldorf-salad-12.html#page1:comment2165674 by lazyme   AND learned some interesting facts about the Waldorf Salad creator. 

Let me tell you a little about a man named, Oscar Tschirky. 
image



What? You haven't heard of him? Why, he is the famed "Oscar of the Waldorf". Hmmm..."Waldorf", you say? "That sounds like a salad."  Bingo! Oscar is the man who is credited with creating THE Waldorf Salad. Oscar was the maitre d'hotel of the Waldorf Hotel in Manhattan, NYC, from the opening day of the hotel, in 1893, until he retired in 1943. It is said that Oscar created the Waldorf Salad for a society supper during the hotel opening. Here is his recipe for the famous salad:
"Waldorf Salad: Peel two raw apple and cut them into small pieces, say about half an inch square, also cut some celery the same way, and mix it with the apple. Be very careful not to let any seeds of the apples be mixed with it. The salad must be dressed with a good mayonnaise." That's it! Did you notice that there are no walnuts in his recipe? Oscar created a cookbook called, "The Cook Book by "Oscar" of the Waldorf" and, of course, included the Waldorf Salad recipe. 
image

Although Oscar wasn't a chef, he was well-respected for his culinary skills and taste. In addition to the Waldorf Salad, he also is said to have created Veal Oscar and Egg Benedict. 

Oscar's reputation was so well known that it was considered a privilege to meet him. For example: One time Oscar was introduced to one of the most prestigious railroad men of the time, who said, "I had rather meet that man than nine out of 10 of your so-called big men either here or in Washington.".
Oscar really paved the way for the current standards of hotel service by his dedication to every task he took as a maitre d'hotel at the Waldorf Astoria. 
Interestingly, he never saw the need for that maitre d'hotel title. He just called himself a "hotel man", and his assistants were called assistants to Oscar. He kept the Waldorf running with perfection - from welcoming guests at the door, checking them into the hotel, ordering dinners, attending the dinners, getting carriages, ordering theatre tickets, etc.... all the way to waving goodbye at checkout and giving a blessing as guests leave. 

I'll leave you with one more interesting fact about our man Oscar. He collected menus as a hobby. After his death, his collected menus, papers and personal memorabilia were donated to Cornell University. Cool!


image


I bet the collection of menus is interesting.  Thanks for sharing your tidbits with us, LifeIsGood.  I'll get your completion noted on Page 1.

  Northwestgal

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#50 [url]

Aug 16 16 12:13 AM

image



I made and enjoyed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/other-salad/classic-waldorf-salad.html by Lavender Lynn.

image



In 1893, millionaire William Waldorf Astor opened the 13-story Waldorf Hotel on the site of his mansion at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street, designed by renowned architect Henry Hardenbergh. Four years later (1897), The Waldorf was joined by the 17-story Astoria Hotel, erected on an adjacent site by Waldorf's cousin, John Jacob Astor IV.

image


While the original hotel was arguably the grandest hotel in the world in the 1920's, with so many new technological advances, it was becoming dated. So the decision was made to sell the site to the developers of what would become the Empire State building and to tear down the hotel in 1929.

image


Conrad Hilton contracted to acquire control of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel on October 12, 1949. Conrad had once written on a photograph of the hotel 'The Greatest Of Them All' and one of his lifelong ambitions was realized by adding Waldorf Astoria New York to his collection.

In 1993, the Waldorf Astoria became an official New York City landmark, joining other major icons like The Empire State Building and Brooklyn Bridge.

image



An interesting bit of trivia…….

On December 12, 1949, Pillsbury held its first Bake-Off contest. Over 150 women from all over the country gathered here in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel baking their best and most delectable recipes for a shot at the grand prize.


 

Quote    Reply   

#51 [url]

Aug 16 16 2:22 AM

lazyme wrote:
image



I made and enjoyed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/other-salad/classic-waldorf-salad.html by Lavender Lynn.

image



In 1893, millionaire William Waldorf Astor opened the 13-story Waldorf Hotel on the site of his mansion at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 33rd Street, designed by renowned architect Henry Hardenbergh. Four years later (1897), The Waldorf was joined by the 17-story Astoria Hotel, erected on an adjacent site by Waldorf's cousin, John Jacob Astor IV.

image


While the original hotel was arguably the grandest hotel in the world in the 1920's, with so many new technological advances, it was becoming dated. So the decision was made to sell the site to the developers of what would become the Empire State building and to tear down the hotel in 1929.

image


Conrad Hilton contracted to acquire control of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel on October 12, 1949. Conrad had once written on a photograph of the hotel 'The Greatest Of Them All' and one of his lifelong ambitions was realized by adding Waldorf Astoria New York to his collection.

In 1993, the Waldorf Astoria became an official New York City landmark, joining other major icons like The Empire State Building and Brooklyn Bridge.

image



An interesting bit of trivia…….

On December 12, 1949, Pillsbury held its first Bake-Off contest. Over 150 women from all over the country gathered here in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel baking their best and most delectable recipes for a shot at the grand prize.



 


It would have been quite interesting to be at the first Pillsbury Bake-Off contest.  I be the kitchen facilities were top notch in the Waldorf-Astoria.  I'll get your completion noted on page 1, lazyme.

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#54 [url]

Aug 17 16 8:55 AM

Under Oscar Tucci, Delmonico’s would become one of the first establishments to allow women to eat there.  He would follow this then unheard of policy by becoming one of the first to allow women to work in a restaurant as well, and would go on to host women’s luncheons and charity work. 

It was Oscar’s Delmonico that came up with the term “86,” as in, "to drop something." If a restaurant runs out of a menu item, it is “86'ed.” As the story goes, menu item 86 was very popular and would sell out quickly. The term “86” became slang for, “We’re out of that.” 

Delmonico’s began pulling New Yorkers downtown for dinners and evenings.  That was thought impossible at that time. The Wall Street area was strictly daytime, lunch or early dinner service only, as it would be deserted at night.Bringing people (and celebrities like Lana Turner, Gypsy Rose Lee, Virgina Graham, Eva Gabor, Red Buttons and Orson Bean, to name a few) back into a “work only” area of NYC, especially when Harlem was considered Gotham's hot spot, is an astounding testament to the influence of Oscar Tucci. 

I made and reviewed Susie's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/apple-wedge-salad-with-golden-balsamic-dressing.html#page1:comment2166674

image

Quote    Reply   

#55 [url]

Aug 18 16 1:04 AM

I have made and reviewed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html by Lazyme.

image

3 Fun Facts

1. On an episode of Mad Men, John Slatterly's character Roger Sterling is sitting at a booth in a restaurant, downing drinks with Don Draper and a prospective client. Sterling is trying to keep the prospective client seated so he and Draper can have some extra time to woo him into their advertising firm. The client doesn't want to say but Sterling insists and orders them all Iceberg Wedge Salads with blue cheese dressing and topped with bacon.

2. Back in the day, people would put steaks on black eyes or bruises to reduce swelling. But did you know that they would also use frozen heads of iceberg lettuce as cold packs for injuries?

3. 
Its true name, by the way, is Crisphead. It got the iceberg moniker because, being especially hardy, it was usually shipped across the country covered in ice.)
 

image

Quote    Reply   

#56 [url]

Aug 19 16 7:00 AM

For this challenge, I have enjoyed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html by teammate Mikekey

image


Random Delmonico's Tidbits:

1. Despite competition from imitators, Delmonico’s remains the ne plus ultra of 19th century haute cuisine. As befits a behemoth of its size and power, Delmonico's was the home to numerous gastronomic “scandals”.  Perhaps the most amusing is the story behind Lobster Newberg – make that Lobster á la Wenberg.  A longtime patron of the 26th Street location, Ben Wenberg (a triple threat of sea captain, foodie, and dandy) hoped to have his name forever enshrined in gastronomic legend.  On one of his visits in 1876, he demonstrated for Charles Delmonico the making of a lobster dish he had discovered on his travels.  Charles pronounced it delicious and added it to the menu, christening it Lobster á la Wenberg.  That is, until Wenberg engaged in a fistfight at the restaurant and was punished for his crass social faux pas.  A little creative wordplay and “Wenberg” became “Newberg”; the lobster dish has been thus known ever since.



2. In addition to woes caused by poor management, another blow to Delmonico’s continued success came in 1917 when the canvasback duck (“One of the noblest institutions of the republic” in culinary terms), a uniquely flavored specimen which fed on wild celery, was forced from its favored feeding grounds in Chesapeake Bay by the area’s new tenant, the United States Army. Having to seek food elsewhere, the canvasbacks began to dine like normal ducks – losing their distinctive flavor in the process.  Delmonico’s were compelled to remove the ever-popular item from their menu, which resulted in the loss of many angry customers.


3. Inflation, eep! In 1941, the most expensive item on the Delmonico's menu was the Whole Cold Lobster Salad for $1.50. Diners could indulge in a Delmonico steak for a mere $1.35. Nowadays, that same steak order would cost you $51.00. If it's a classic wedge salad you're after, that will set you back $14. 

Bonus: Baked Alaska was created by Charles Ranhofer (chef de cuisine at Delmonico's from 1862-1876, and again from 1879-1896). This iconic dessert was created to celebrate the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867.


Quote    Reply   

#57 [url]

Aug 19 16 7:08 AM

Mikekey wrote:
Under Oscar Tucci, Delmonico’s would become one of the first establishments to allow women to eat there.  He would follow this then unheard of policy by becoming one of the first to allow women to work in a restaurant as well, and would go on to host women’s luncheons and charity work. 

It was Oscar’s Delmonico that came up with the term “86,” as in, "to drop something." If a restaurant runs out of a menu item, it is “86'ed.” As the story goes, menu item 86 was very popular and would sell out quickly. The term “86” became slang for, “We’re out of that.” 

Delmonico’s began pulling New Yorkers downtown for dinners and evenings.  That was thought impossible at that time. The Wall Street area was strictly daytime, lunch or early dinner service only, as it would be deserted at night.Bringing people (and celebrities like Lana Turner, Gypsy Rose Lee, Virgina Graham, Eva Gabor, Red Buttons and Orson Bean, to name a few) back into a “work only” area of NYC, especially when Harlem was considered Gotham's hot spot, is an astounding testament to the influence of Oscar Tucci. 

I made and reviewed Susie's http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/apple-wedge-salad-with-golden-balsamic-dressing.html#page1:comment2166674

image



Thank you for making my wedge salad recipe! The photo is stunning too! 
The term "86" is still used today.  I enjoy history! 
 

Quote    Reply   

#58 [url]

Aug 19 16 7:10 AM

Lavender Lynn wrote:
I have made and reviewed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html by Lazyme.

image

3 Fun Facts

1. On an episode of Mad Men, John Slatterly's character Roger Sterling is sitting at a booth in a restaurant, downing drinks with Don Draper and a prospective client. Sterling is trying to keep the prospective client seated so he and Draper can have some extra time to woo him into their advertising firm. The client doesn't want to say but Sterling insists and orders them all Iceberg Wedge Salads with blue cheese dressing and topped with bacon.

2. Back in the day, people would put steaks on black eyes or bruises to reduce swelling. But did you know that they would also use frozen heads of iceberg lettuce as cold packs for injuries?

3. 
Its true name, by the way, is Crisphead. It got the iceberg moniker because, being especially hardy, it was usually shipped across the country covered in ice.)

 


That's a pretty salad Lynn.  
Interesting on how iceberg got it's name. =)

Quote    Reply   

#59 [url]

Aug 19 16 7:15 AM

Muffin Goddess wrote:
For this challenge, I have enjoyed http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/parmesan-peppercorn-wedge-salad.html by teammate Mikekey

image


Random Delmonico's Tidbits:

1. Despite competition from imitators, Delmonico’s remains the ne plus ultra of 19th century haute cuisine. As befits a behemoth of its size and power, Delmonico's was the home to numerous gastronomic “scandals”.  Perhaps the most amusing is the story behind Lobster Newberg – make that Lobster á la Wenberg.  A longtime patron of the 26th Street location, Ben Wenberg (a triple threat of sea captain, foodie, and dandy) hoped to have his name forever enshrined in gastronomic legend.  On one of his visits in 1876, he demonstrated for Charles Delmonico the making of a lobster dish he had discovered on his travels.  Charles pronounced it delicious and added it to the menu, christening it Lobster á la Wenberg.  That is, until Wenberg engaged in a fistfight at the restaurant and was punished for his crass social faux pas.  A little creative wordplay and “Wenberg” became “Newberg”; the lobster dish has been thus known ever since.



2. In addition to woes caused by poor management, another blow to Delmonico’s continued success came in 1917 when the canvasback duck (“One of the noblest institutions of the republic” in culinary terms), a uniquely flavored specimen which fed on wild celery, was forced from its favored feeding grounds in Chesapeake Bay by the area’s new tenant, the United States Army. Having to seek food elsewhere, the canvasbacks began to dine like normal ducks – losing their distinctive flavor in the process.  Delmonico’s were compelled to remove the ever-popular item from their menu, which resulted in the loss of many angry customers.


3. Inflation, eep! In 1941, the most expensive item on the Delmonico's menu was the Whole Cold Lobster Salad for $1.50. Diners could indulge in a Delmonico steak for a mere $1.35. Nowadays, that same steak order would cost you $51.00. If it's a classic wedge salad you're after, that will set you back $14. 

Bonus: Baked Alaska was created by Charles Ranhofer (chef de cuisine at Delmonico's from 1862-1876, and again from 1879-1896). This iconic dessert was created to celebrate the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867.


I tried mikekey's salad too! 

I thought the info on Newberg was facinating. I hadn't seen it before! 

Quote    Reply   

#60 [url]

Aug 20 16 9:25 AM

MERPed Mikekey's recipe: http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/iceberg-wedge-salad-with-strawberries.html
image

Factoid #1 -  The original Delmonico’s offered a new novelty in dining, including the Parisian "bill of fare", or a carte, (which today we call a menu) instead of a price fix meal. Modern-day Delmonico's has the largest restaruant wine cellar in the world.

Factoid #2 - According to a Tanimura and Antile, California Lettuce Growers, there is a different history of our chosen topic: 
"What About The Wedge?
   While there don’t seem to be any claimants (hotels, chefs or restaurants) to the
invention of the classic American Iceberg Wedge Salad, the general consensus places
it as a ubiquitous menu entry of the 1950’s and 1960’s.
   After a brief decline in popularity in the 1970’s and 1980’s, the Iceberg Wedge Salad is
enjoying a retro rebirth on trendy menus.
   Steakhouses refuse to give it up; it remains a popular mainstay offering at
steakhouses across the U.S.
   New popular toppings include Maytag bleu cheese, chunky feta, avocados, bacon, and
nuts."

Factoid #3 - In 1941 at Oscar's Delmonico at 56 Beaver Street the menu included the following:
The Delmonico Steak was $1.35
Chicken with Rice was $1.00
Broiled French Lamb Chops were .95 cents
Chicken Salad was $1.15
Whole Cold Lobster Salad was $1.50, the most expensive item on the menu
Coffee was .20 cents
Tea was .20 cents
Spumoni was .30 cents
Slice of Boston Cream Pie was.25 cents 

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