#25 [url]

Aug 13 16 9:49 PM

image


History of the Wedge Salad

Oscar Tucci owner of The Original Oscar's Delmoncio has been credited with creating the Wedge Salad and making it the classic that we know today. In 1927, restaurateur Oscar Tucci purchased the entire 70,000 square foot building at 56 Beaver Street. First opening a speakeasy, in 1933, after the repeal of Prohibition, he opened Oscar's Delmonico. Period cookbooks, old newspapers (esp. New York Times historic), and culinary reference books confirm the popularity of iceberg (also known as crisphead) lettuce in the 1920s. They do not, however, reveal claimants (hotels, chefs, restaurants) to the invention of the classic American wedge-type salad served with creamy dressing. The general concensus of current sources squarely places this salad as a ubiquitous menu entry of the 1950s and 1960s.
Delmonico's Wedge Salad
 
image

image

To make the classic wedge salad,
simply take the outer leaves off of an Iceberg or Crisphead head of lettuce, do not core, and cut in half and then in half again or as small a wedge as you like.

Top with 1/ 4 cup bleu cheese dressing,
1/ 4 cup chopped tomato and
1/4 cup crumbled bacon
garnish with 1 / 4 cup chopped green onions (optional)

About the Classic Iceberg Wedge
Period cookbooks, old newspapers (esp. New York Times historic), and culinary reference books confirm the popularity of iceberg (also known as crisphead) lettuce in the 1920s. They do not, however, reveal claimants (hotels, chefs, restaurants) to the invention of the classic American wedge-type salad served with creamy dressing. The general concensus of current sources squarely places this salad as a ubiquitous menu entry of the 1950s and 1960s. The lettuce wedge lost its place in the 1970s when consumers were intrigued by more interesting salads. Recently, the iceberg wedge salad has resurfaced as a "reinvented" item on trendy menus. The new accompaniments are blue cheese (Maytag, esp.) and nuts.

Here is one of the oldest recorded recipes for the Iceberg Wedge

MarionHarris.jpg

Lettuce Salad and Roquefort Dressing  (1916)
Ingredients;
Lettuce hearts
1 clove garlic
1/4 teaspoonful dry mustard
1 saltspoonful salt
1 saltspoonful paprika
3 tablespoonfuls vinegar
Olive oil
3 tablespoonfuls Roquefort cheese
2 hard-cooked eggs
Place the lettuce hearts in a salad bowl which has been rubbed over with the cut clove of garlic. Mix together the mustard, salt, paprika, vinegar, and beat in olive oil until thick; then gradually add the cheeese and the hard-cooked yolks of eggs rubbed through a sieve. Pour over the lettuce and serve garnished with the whites of eggs."

---Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing Dish Recipes, Marion Harris Neil [David McKay:Philadelphia] 1916 (p. 214)
[1949] "Heart of Lettuce Salad
Form cups from better outer leaves of iceberg lettuce. Cut head into 4 to 6 wedge shaped pieces, then arrange a wedge in each cup of lettuce. Make one to two lengthwise, then cross-wise cuts almost through the wedge to make cutting of salad with fork easier. Garnish with strip of pimento, celery curl and carrot strips. Top with favorite dressing."
---"Salads," Chicago Defender , December 10, 1949 (p. 20)
[1950]
"Lettuce Salad with Roquefort Dressing
1 head lettuce
1 tablespoon chopped chirves
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
Roquefort French Dressing
Remove outside leaves and core from lettuce; wash and drain. Cut lengthwise into quarters; arrange each on a salad plate; sprinkle with chives and parsley, and serve with dressing. Serves 4. Instead of Roquefort French Dressing use: Avocado Dressing, Cottage Cheese Dressing, Frozen Tomato Mayonnaise."
--- Culinary Arts Institute Encyclopedic Cookbook , Ruth Berolzheimer editor [Culinary Arts Institute:Chicago] 1950 (p. 537)
[1958]
"Salade Subversive
ingredients: lettuce, tomato, Russian Dressing
procedure:
1. cut [lettuce] into wedges
2. cut [tomato] into quarters
3. arrange thusly [wedge in the middle of the plate, tomato quarter on each side]
4. pour over [Russian dressing]--serve."
--- The New Wolf in Chef's Clothing: The picture cook and drink book for men , Robert H. Loeb, Jr. [Follett Publishing Company:Chicago] 1950, 1958 (p. 53)
[1963]
"Head lettuce , or iceberg lettuce, or Simpson lettuce is the most familiar of lettuces. It is the firm, tight, compace head of light-green leaves. Separated, the leaves make a lettuce cup as a container for potato salad, fruit salad, and so on. Cut in wedges, it is a favorite of men, particularly those who like to pour blue-cheese dressing over it."
--- McCall's Cook Book [Random House:New York] 1963 (p. 490)

For this challenge I've made:
The Classic Wedge Salad
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html  By Lazyme

Stock Photos






Last Edited By: Annacia Aug 14 16 1:30 AM. Edited 4 times.

Quote    Reply   

#29 [url]

Aug 14 16 6:52 AM

Annacia wrote:
image

I've done more research and have updated my completion post. Clearly I was looking in the wrong places.  image


Thank you for adding historical info about the restaurant/  chef to your post.  
For some reason your link takes one to a 404 pg. This is the link which works for me.  (in case you need it elsewhere)
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/the-classic-wedge-salad.html 

Quote    Reply   

#31 [url]

Aug 14 16 8:47 AM

Hi!  I'm here to submit my seletion for the Wedge.

I made Iceberg Wedge salad with Strawberries by MikeKey
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/iceberg-wedge-salad-with-strawberries.html#page1:comment2165278

image

Some interesting historical facts about both the restaurant and Oscar Tucci.. In 1927, Oscar Tucci opened a "Delmonico's" popularly called "Oscar's Delmonico's" at the former Delmonico's location at 56 Beaver Street and South William Street in New The building was first erected by the Delmonico’s in February 1836  and this structure became known as The Citadel’.  

The Tucci incarnation adopted the original menus and recipes, and became distinguished in its own right, continuing to attract prominent politicians and celebrities. Tucci also instituted many of the professional standards in use today in American restaurants. The Tucci era also produced three of the most prominent restaurateurs of the twentieth century: Sirio Maccioni of Le Cirque fame, Tony May of San Domenico and Rainbow Room fame, and Harry Poulakakos of Harry at Hanover Square. 

The coolest fact about Oscar Tucci… Under Oscar Tucci, Delmonico’s would become one of the first establishments to allow women to eat there. It’s hard to over-emphasize how monumental this was. In comparison, McSorley’s Old Ale House, another of New York’s oldest eateries, didn’t allow women inside until the 1970s. He would follow this then unheard of policy by becoming one of the first to allow women to work in a restaurant as well, and would go on to host women’s luncheons and charity work (The Salvation Army and Casa Italiana Colombia University were a few).  
While seemingly a small thing these days, Oscar Tucci really did help blaze a trail for women’s rights.

  image


 

Last Edited By: K9 Owned Aug 14 16 9:05 AM. Edited 1 time.

Quote    Reply   

#32 [url]

Aug 14 16 10:31 PM

Annacia gave us a wonderful history of the Wedge Salad and as we are tasked with finding 3 historical tidbits about the restaurant or Oscar thought I would take a little different route here.

image
If we go way back Delmonico’s started out in 1827 selling pastries and cigars on 23 Williams Street. Ten years later they added steaks and an immense wine cellar, eventually expanding into 10 locations. In 1923 the Delmonico dynasty came to an end and all the Delmonico’s restaurants were closed.
  It was in 1929, shortly before the Wall Street Crash and Prohibition, Oscar Tucci re-opened, re-established and resurrected the famous South William Street building which he named Delmonico's Restaurant after the original (1837) but which the public knew as Oscar's Delmonico or just simply  Oscar's and carried the famous location in the Tucci family for the next 50 years.
  Meanwhile 1927, restaurateur Oscar Tucci purchased the entire 70,000 square foot building at 56 Beaver Street. First opening a speakeasy, in 1933, after the repeal of Prohibition, Oscar Tucci transformed the business into another Oscar's Delmonico the defunct restaurant he had bought back in 1929.

image


Oscar Tucci was a trend setter by allowing women to eat and work at Delmonic’s, becoming the first restaurant of its kind to do so in New York. Another way Oscar Tucci supported women and woman’s rights was to host women’s charity luncheons (one of which was The Salvation Army).
  Tucci made his Wall Street location a popular place to be when he hosted parties for American Royalty, Wall Street Tycoons, U.S. Presidents, International Leaders and Hollywood; Such as Gypsy Rose Lee, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Red Buttons, Lana Turner, President Richard Nixon, Bella Abzug and so many others. All of who enjoyed Tucci’s original menus and recipes such as The Wedge Salad and The Lobster Newberg.

image

  Delmonico's Cookbook
image

Annacia already gave us the very first cookbook showing The Wedge Salad so thought I would bring you the oldest English language cookbook, The Forme of Cury (written in the 1300's), contains the first known recipe for salad, a brazen little number that called for lettuce, leeks and spinach served with garlic, herbs and flowers.
image

Made and reviewed Wedge Salad with Balsamic
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/wedge-salad-with-balsamic.html?p=25 image
 

Quote    Reply   

#33 [url]

Aug 14 16 11:54 PM

K9 Owned wrote:
Hi!  I'm here to submit my seletion for the Wedge.

I made Iceberg Wedge salad with Strawberries by MikeKey
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/iceberg-wedge-salad-with-strawberries.html#page1:comment2165278

image

Some interesting historical facts about both the restaurant and Oscar Tucci.. In 1927, Oscar Tucci opened a "Delmonico's" popularly called "Oscar's Delmonico's" at the former Delmonico's location at 56 Beaver Street and South William Street in New The building was first erected by the Delmonico’s in February 1836  and this structure became known as The Citadel’.  

The Tucci incarnation adopted the original menus and recipes, and became distinguished in its own right, continuing to attract prominent politicians and celebrities. Tucci also instituted many of the professional standards in use today in American restaurants. The Tucci era also produced three of the most prominent restaurateurs of the twentieth century: Sirio Maccioni of Le Cirque fame, Tony May of San Domenico and Rainbow Room fame, and Harry Poulakakos of Harry at Hanover Square. 

The coolest fact about Oscar Tucci… Under Oscar Tucci, Delmonico’s would become one of the first establishments to allow women to eat there. It’s hard to over-emphasize how monumental this was. In comparison, McSorley’s Old Ale House, another of New York’s oldest eateries, didn’t allow women inside until the 1970s. He would follow this then unheard of policy by becoming one of the first to allow women to work in a restaurant as well, and would go on to host women’s luncheons and charity work (The Salvation Army and Casa Italiana Colombia University were a few).  
While seemingly a small thing these days, Oscar Tucci really did help blaze a trail for women’s rights.

 
 


Your wedge salad photo is beutiful! 

I liked the info about Tucci being the first to admit women to the traditional steakhouse. It seems such a small step today, but back then it was a major change.  

Quote    Reply   

#34 [url]

Aug 15 16 12:02 AM

Debbwl wrote:
Annacia gave us a wonderful history of the Wedge Salad and as we are tasked with finding 3 historical tidbits about the restaurant or Oscar thought I would take a little different route here.

image

image



  Tucci made his Wall Street location a popular place to be when he hosted parties for American Royalty, Wall Street Tycoons, U.S. Presidents, International Leaders and Hollywood; Such as Gypsy Rose Lee, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Red Buttons, Lana Turner, President Richard Nixon, Bella Abzug and so many others. All of who enjoyed Tucci’s original menus and recipes such as The Wedge Salad and The Lobster Newberg.




Made and reviewed Wedge Salad with Balsamic
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/wedge-salad-with-balsamic.html?p=25 image

 


Your wedge salad looks divine! I think it's wonderful to find out the history of items still on menus today.

Can you imagine having to dress like that to go out to dinner? 

Quote    Reply   

#36 [url]

Aug 15 16 2:28 AM

For the Gift Shop ...

For the Waldorf vs. Wedge challenge, I have made The Classic Wedge Salad by lazyme.  (In hindsight, I think using a red plate for this salad wasn't the best choice  image)  But it was a yummy lunch salad nonetheless.  By participating in this challenge, I did learn something new, too.  I had never split a head of iceberg lettuce in the way that's covered in this recipe's instructions.  A few good whacks against my counter and a couple of twists, and it was much easier and more effective than struggling with the core using a knife, as I've always done in the past.

image

The Wedge Salad is attributed to Oscar Tucci, perhaps best known as the owner of Delmonico's Restaurant. But Oscar Tucci is known for other achievements as well.  Here is a bit of interesting trivia regarding Oscar Tucci: 

Out of the Cellar, an interesting feature that appeared in the New York Times in 1987, points out that Oscar Tucci had an extensive inventory of rare, quirky and expensive wines in his collection that he kept in his private wine cellar.  His entire wine collection was shipped to his son's (Mario Tucci) home in Connecticut where they remained until the entire wine collection was auctioned off in 1985.  It was then that the collection came into the possession of wine conneseurs Alan Stillman (owner of a popular Manhattan steakhouse) and Peter Morrell (owner of the Manhattan wine boutique Morrell and Co.).  The more interesting of the collection were Bourdeaux and Burgundy.  One in particular that Tucci had reserved for a special occasion was a $600 bottle of a 1964 La Tache.  A degree of ullage (loss of quality and taste due to evaporation or leakage) is expected in stored wines, especially older wines.  But it's said that Tucci's wines were perfectly stored and survived quite well; only a degree of ullage was found in most of the wine collection. Nearly all white wines will take on a brown tint (and some can adopt a "nutty" tone) after lengthy storage, which was found in some of the older white wines.  But some consider it an example of improving with age, depending on one's palate of course.

According to Historical Text Archives (facts attributed to Mary Tucci), restauranteur Oscar Tucci is credited with establishing the term "86'ed" within the restaurant business, a term that's used to refer to refusing service or ejecting an unruly or disruptive patron.

And did you know that, besides being a restauranteur, Oscar Tucci is equally well known for his party hosting finesse?  He was famous for hosting private parties for international leaders, dignitaries, and Hollywood "big wigs" such as Zsa Zsa Gabor, Red Buttons, Lana Turner, numerous Wall Street tycoons, and even Richard Nixon (as well as many other U.S. presidents and world leaders).

 

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#37 [url]

Aug 15 16 5:07 AM

For the Gift Shop

Waldorf or Wedge- Tale of 2 Oscars -
http://4foodfriendsandfun.yuku.com/topic/1712/Waldorf-Vs-Wedge-A-Tale-of-Two-Oscars 
BK - Waldorf Salad by Lazyme


This delicious salad took less than 30 minutes to make.  It was wonderful, refreshing and tasty, full of bright flavor with nice crisp and crunchy textures. 


image

Waldorf by Choice  image The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel

The Waldorf salad was also known as the Waldorf Astoria Salad.  It is considered one of the quintessential New York dishes, and has been enjoyed the world-over since its inception in the late 19th century.  It is commonly served as a starter and in our opinion, it pairs well with a cold glass of dry white wine.

The dish was created between 1893 and 1896 at the newly-opened Waldorf Hotel on Park Avenue (it is now known as the Waldorf-Astoria).  The hotel, though, wasn't where we think of the hotel as being no, at that time it was actually located on the site where the Empire State Building was built.

Oscar Tschirky  the famous “Oscar of the Waldorf” was the maitre d’hotel at that time, and he is credited with having invented the salad in its original guise. His reputation was so well-known, that, for many, it was considered a privilege to meet him.

image

In 1896, the recipe for Waldorf salad was published in Tschirky’s cookbook - Oscar of the Waldorf, where he instructs: “Peel two raw apples and cut them into small pieces, say about half an inch square, also cut some celery the same way, and mix it with the apple. Be very careful not to let any seeds of the apples be mixed with it. The salad must be dressed with a good mayonnaise.”

The walnuts weren’t added for roughly 10 years, perfection often takes a while.

In 1934, Cole Porter raved about the Waldorf Salad in his tune You’re the Top. 

Exert is from the song "You're the Top" in the musical "Anything Goes" by Cole Porter.

"You're the top! You're a Waldorf salad.
You're the top! You're a Berlin ballad.
You're a baby grand of a lady and a gent.
You're an old Dutch master, You're Mrs. Astor,
You're Pepsodent."

Meanwhile, in the UK, the John Cleese sitcom Fawlty Towers featured an episode entitled Waldorf Salad; Episode 9 - (5 March 1979), in it, an American tourist demands that Cleese’s hotel manager character Basil, serves him a Waldorf salad.  He doesn't have the foggiest how to make one, and offers them a "Ritz Salad" (which the guests have never heard, as there is no such thing, which means Basil can toss into it whatever he wants.) At this, Basil replies that his hotel is “out of Waldorfs”. 

Finally, Basil's wife Polly manages to make one.
 

Quote    Reply   

#38 [url]

Aug 15 16 7:24 AM

Sheepdoc prepared Apple Wedge Salad with Golden Balsamic Dressing by Susie D for the Waldorf vs. Wedge challenge. 

Oscar Tucci, owner of the Delmonico restaurant in NYC, is credited with creating the wedge salad. 

The first Delmonico restaurant opened in a pastry shop in 1827. 

Oscar Tucci purchased the location of a former Delmonico's restaurant in 1927 and opened a speakeasy and then later a restaurant. 

Delmonico's was the first restaurant to have an a la carte menu. 

image

 

Sheepdoc


image

Quote    Reply   

#39 [url]

Aug 15 16 7:30 AM

Vickie wrote:
For the Gift Shop ...

For the Waldorf vs. Wedge challenge, I have made The Classic Wedge Salad by lazyme.  (In hindsight, I think using a red plate for this salad wasn't the best choice  image)  But it was a yummy lunch salad nonetheless.  By participating in this challenge, I did learn something new, too.  I had never split a head of iceberg lettuce in the way that's covered in this recipe's instructions.  A few good whacks against my counter and a couple of twists, and it was much easier and more effective than struggling with the core using a knife, as I've always done in the past.

image

The Wedge Salad is attributed to Oscar Tucci, perhaps best known as the owner of Delmonico's Restaurant. But Oscar Tucci is known for other achievements as well.  Here is a bit of interesting trivia regarding Oscar Tucci: 


 


People always gasp the first time they see someone "bang" the core, but it really works.  
I enjoyed your Oscar facts. Nice job! 

Quote    Reply   

#40 [url]

Aug 15 16 7:33 AM

Baby Kato wrote:
For the Gift Shop

Waldorf or Wedge- Tale of 2 Oscars -
http://4foodfriendsandfun.yuku.com/topic/1712/Waldorf-Vs-Wedge-A-Tale-of-Two-Oscars 
BK - Waldorf Salad by Lazyme


This delicious salad took less than 30 minutes to make.  It was wonderful, refreshing and tasty, full of bright flavor with nice crisp and crunchy textures. 


image

orf-Astoria Hotel


In 1934, Cole Porter raved about the Waldorf Salad in his tune You’re the Top. 

Exert is from the song "You're the Top" in the musical "Anything Goes" by Cole Porter.

"You're the top! You're a Waldorf salad.
You're the top! You're a Berlin ballad.
You're a baby grand of a lady and a gent.
You're an old Dutch master, You're Mrs. Astor,
You're Pepsodent."

Meanwhile, in the UK, the John Cleese sitcom Fawlty Towers featured an episode entitled Waldorf Salad; Episode 9 - (5 March 1979), in it, an American tourist demands that Cleese’s hotel manager character Basil, serves him a Waldorf salad.  He doesn't have the foggiest how to make one, and offers them a "Ritz Salad" (which the guests have never heard, as there is no such thing, which means Basil can toss into it whatever he wants.) At this, Basil replies that his hotel is “out of Waldorfs”. 

Finally, Basil's wife Polly manages to make one.

 


I didn't know about Cole Porter song lyrics.  You did a lovely job on your report & your photo looks awesome! 

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help