#41 [url]

Aug 25 16 8:45 PM

Leggy Peggy wrote:
image

The newly-formed 
Twisted Sisters Tour Group proudly announces their Third Guided Tour. This tour follows on from the events, so capably arranged by our CEO, Twissis, and fellow traveller, K9 Owned. This tour focuses on public art displays in New York City, including some amazing neighbourhood street art in the famous community of Harlem.  

=24pxTour basics
Tour type - Luxury tour bus and on foot
Tour itinerary - See attached brochure
Tour date - Tuesday, 30 August 2016
Departure - The tour departs at 10 am from the Waldorf Astoria (setting for the Culinary Quest)

Return - The tour bus will return you to the same spot at 4pm
Cost - $60 per person with a 20% discount available to Culinary Quest #3 participants (lunch included)
Entertainment - The Twisted Sisters will perform a new Line-Dance Rockette-Style routine (again with choreography by Nancy's Pantry)

Preview -  imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

Your transport -

image.... image 


=24pxTour brochure


Greater New York is exhbiting some new public art including 20 pieces that have been commissioned especially for this Northern Hemisphere summer. Our tour doesn't have enough time to visit all 20, so we'll be checking out the ones that have been the most popular so far this year. No need to worry about the addresses, because your tour bus will take you there. The day ends with a short walking tour of some of the best street art in Harlem. 

Stop #1 - Let's get off to a spooky start with Cornelia Parker's Transitional Object (Psycho Barn)
This red barn sits on the roof of The Metropolitan Art Museum. It draws its inspiration from the creepy Bates motel in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film Psycho, as well as the paintings of Edward Hopper.

image


Stop #2 - Next is Isa Genzken’s Two Orchids. This piece towers over the southeast entrance to Central Park. Its immaculate white petals are perched on two thin stems made of stainless steel, standing 34 and 28 feet high. The last time this piece was publically displayed was in Venice. 

image

Stop #3 - 
Everyone needs a bit of sparkle in the morning, so our next stop is at Martin Puryear’s Big Bling. It is the 33rd public art installation from Madison Square Park Conservancy’s art program. This abstract sculpture is 40 feet tall, with multiple tiers, and is constructed from birch wood varnished in 22-karat gold leaf. 

image

Stop #4 - 
Then on to Deborah Kass’s new sculpture, OY/YO, on Brooklyn Bridge Park’s waterfront. This sassy sculpture means different things depending on which side you stand on. It can signify the popular Yiddish expression ‘Oy’ (as in Oy Vey!) or the popular urban slang phrase ‘Yo’ and the Spanish translation of ‘I am’.

image

Stop #5 - 
No tour is complete without a visit to Coney Island. This annual exhibit features 21 murals by various artists. This year’s talent comes from big names, including Craze, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh and Mister Cartoon (pictured). The pieces are part of Greenwood Beach, an outdoor market with food from Calexico and Table 87, among others.

This will also be our lunch stop. Given that we are looking at outdoor art, we thought it fitting to have street food for lunch. 


image

image

Stop #6 - 
After the hustle and bustle of Coney Island, we’re off to Governor’s Island Park. This summer, four man-made hills, designed by landscape architects, West 8, grace this tranquil park. Rachel Whiteread’s Cabin is nestled along the edge of Discovery Hill, overlooking New York Harbour and the Statue of Liberty. 

image

Stop #7 - 
While on Governor’s Island, we’ll pop round to see the new sculpture garden (pictured) created as part of the Figment Participatory Art Festival that was in June. There’s also a ‘refurbished’ treehouse, a mini golf course and dream pavilions (but we won’t have time for all of those).

image

Before being returned to the Waldorf by tour bus, the remainder of the afternoon will be a compact walking tour of some street art in Harlem. 

The Manhattan neighborhood of Harlem has a rich history as the birthplace of the Harlem Renaissance. This rennaisance brought forth a wealth of African-American literature, art and music that began in the late 1910s. Today, visitors to Harlem can see many community murals celebrating that history, if they know where to look. Luckily, we do.

Stop #8 - We'll start our Harlem visit at the Hope Steven Garden. In 1986, Eva Cockcroft painted a mural titled Homage to Seurat: La Grande Jatte in Harlem. Over the years, the mural faded and paint began to peel because of exposure to the elements. The mural’s decay made its ultimate demise seem inevitable. But, in 2009, after pressure from the community, the mural was fully restored. Here are the two sides of the mural.

image


image

Stop #9 - As we walk, we'll see many notable, as well as many unsigned murals (artists unknown). 
There is also a series of portraits of people associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Here are musician Billy Strayhorn, playing the piano, with a couple dancing in the background, and Duke Ellington, the famous jazz musician, composer and band leader.

image


image

Stop #10 - We
’ll wrap up our walking tour with two views of this mural celebrating Harlem’s musical history. Designed by artist Frank Parga, The Melody of Harlem, was painted by members of the local community.

image


image

Your bus will now return you to the Waldorf Astoria. Hope you have enjoyed your day.


That would be a very cool tour, Leggy Peggy.  The art tour would be so enlightening.  Thanks for completing this challenge.  I'll get your completion noted on Page 1.

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#42 [url]

Aug 25 16 9:00 PM

PanNan wrote:
Pi-Rho Tours
75 minute Wall Street Guided Walking Tour
Friday, August 26, 2016
Meet at 10:00 a.m. at Trinity Church, 74 Trinity Pl., entrance at Broadway and the head of Wall St
$30 per adult, $15 per child ages 12 and under

Welcome to our Wall Street Tour, ladies and gentlemen. You are in the southern tip of Manhattan. It is the oldest part of New York. Here, the Dutch founded the settlement of Nieuw Amsterdam in the seventeenth century, purchasing the territory from local Indians, before surrendering it to the British in 1674. As New York expanded uptown and America became a world power, the city's most historic district became the seat of international finance, home to Wall Street, the New York Stock Exchange, and landmark skyscrapers.

image


We start the tour at Trinity Church which was the tallest building in Manhattan until 1890, because of its 279-foot spire. What you see today is actually the third version of the church—the first, built in 1698, was destroyed by fire and the second was torn down in 1839 after significant storm damage. The current Gothic Revival edition was designed by architect Richard Upjohn and completed in 1846. Note the heavy bronze doors: these were designed by Richard Morris Hunt, who is famous for designing the Statue of Liberty's pedestal. We’ll also check out the adjacent Trinity Churchyard, where many luminaries are buried, including the first secretary of the treasury Alexander Hamilton, inventor of the steamboat Robert Fulton, and famous financier John Jacob Astor.

image


The first building on the right as we enter Wall Street from Broadway is one of the best-designed buildings of Ralph Walker. In the Art Deco style, the building was constructed between 1929-32 for the Irving Trust Co. Through the tall windows we have a view of the flaming mosaic walls designed by Mildrett Meière. The Bank of New York, founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1789, was the first stock traded on the New York Stock Exchange in 1792.

image

#14 Bankers Trust is on the left side of the street. Built in 1912 by Trowbridge & Livingston, the stepped pyramid at the top is so iconic that Bankers Trust adopted it as the company logo. One thing you might notice is that this particular building appears to rise completely vertically, rather than inward steps. This is because this building was built before New York City instituted its set-back laws, which was a response to complaints that buildings like the Bankers Trust Building created a darkened Wall Street below. You can see the difference between this building and 40 Wall Street, which was built under the new rules.

image

At 11 Wall Street is the largest stock exchange in the world, the New York Stock Exchange. It had its humble beginnings in 1792 when twenty-four ambitious brokers established trading ground rules beneath a buttonwood tree further down Wall Street. Now the trading takes place inside the stock exchange's neo-classical masterpiece, built in 1903 and designed by George B. Post. The Broad Street façade is celebrated for its grandiose pediment, a marble sculpture by John Quincy Adams Ward titled "Integrity Protecting the Works of Man," which looms above six enormous Corinthian capitals. Due to security concerns, tours are no longer allowed. But the action on the trading floor never stops, with shares of some $169 billion changing hands daily.

image

The Federal Hall National Memorial at 26 Wall Street was built in 1842 in the Classic style, with Greek and Roman details. The building is said to reflect the democratic ideals of ancient Greece and the power of the Roman Empire. It’s on the site of the original Federal Hall. The first building, built in 1700 and torn down in 1812, served as America's first capitol and was the stage of several major scenes in American history. John Quincy Adams Ward's famous bronze statue of Washington from 1882 stands exactly where the first president would have taken his oath on April 30, 1789. The Bill of Rights was adopted here in September of that year. Step around to the north of the building, where you'll find a bas relief sculpture of George Washington praying at Valley Forge. The hall now contains a mall museum commemorating the building's history. Let’s step inside to see the former vault in the basement and visit the changing exhibits that are on display. We’ll spend a few minutes in the visitor center here so you can look around. This is a great place to use the bathroom facilities if anyone would like to.

image

Morgan Guaranty Trust at 23 Wall Street was the bank of J.P. Morgan, who said he did not have to build a skyscraper as a monument to his wealth since everyone knew how much he was worth. He died a year before the building was completed in 1914. The headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co. was so well known as the "House of Morgan" or "the Corner" that the actual name of the investment bank was never marked on its façade.

image

Let’s take a closer look on the Wall Street side of the building where gouges can still be seen under the last two windows from a bomb blast in 1920. A cart of TNT was exploded, killing 33 people and sending more than 300 to the hospital with injuries. No one was arrested, although anarchists were suspected.

imageimageimage
image
image
The façade of #40 Wall Street now boasts the name Trump, it’s current owner, and is used for commercial offices. The building was once the tallest building in the world. Constructed by H. Craig Severance and Yasuo Matsui for the Bank of Manhattan in 1929, it was designed to be the tallest building in the world. But William Van Alen was building the Chrysler Building on 42nd Street, and he surpassed the height of 40 Wall Street by raising a spire on the top of the Chrysler Building three days after 40 Wall Street opened. Both buildings were surpassed when the Empire State Building was completed the following year.

image

The Museum of American Finance is now located in the grand hall of the former Bank of New York Building. The Museum, a non-profit Smithsonian affiliate, is the only independent museum dedicated to providing educational programs on “finance, the financial markets, money, banking and Alexander Hamilton,” according to their website.

image

#55 Wall Street was built after the fire of 1835 destroyed the original Merchants’ Exchange. The three-story Ionic temple-style building boasts 16 single block granite columns of Quincy granite and a commanding central hall that is now an events facility. The upper floors were added by McKim, Mead & White in 1907 after the custom house relocated from this building to Bowling Green. Today, the upper floors are 106 exquisite apartments.

image

image


#60 Wall Street, a 50-story skyscraper, is the tallest building on Wall Street. Built in 1985 for JP Morgan and Company, it was purchased by Deutsche Bank in 2001. Once the attacks of 911 damaged the company’s building on Liberty Street, the 5500 employees were relocated here. The design is a modern interpretation of a Greek temple. On the roof at 737 feet is a solar installation, which is the highest solar PV installation in the world.

This concludes our guided tour of Wall Street. If you enjoyed this tour, we recommend that you also visit the Wall Street Bull and the Alexander Hamilton U. S. Custom House on Bowling Green. You also might enjoy Fraunces Tavern Museum on Pearl Street where George Washington held a victory banquet and bid farewell to his officers in 1783, after the British had been defeated. We also recommend a walk in the Stone Street Historic District and a visit to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Liberty Street where the world’s largest gold reserves are held. It was a pleasure to guide you on Wall Street today. Please continue to enjoy your visit in New York City.


Thanks for completing this challenge, PanNan.  I learned so much about New York architecture.  I was a teenager the last time I was in New York City, so many of the newest additions and updates were added to some of these iconic buildings.  Your completion makes me want to return to New York. 
 

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#43 [url]

Aug 26 16 4:21 AM

image

                                                                      BIG APPLE ADVENTURE TOURS  
                                            YOUR NOT SO ORDINARY TOUR OF GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL                                            

Tour Type:             Walking Tour
Destination:          Grand Central Terminal 
Departs:                10:00 am from the street-level atrium at 120 Park Avenue (SW corner of East 42nd St and Park Ave) directly across street from Terminal
Returns:                12:00 pm
Cost:                     $30 per person
  
Start of Tour:
Our tour focuses not only on the archtectural highlights of the Terminal, but provides a real story about little known secrets, anecdotes, archival material, and the History of the Terminal. Most people touring see the trains and the shops  - but that's too ordinary for us!  You will not see Grand Central with the same eyes after taking our tour!

image

While we're standing here looking at the facade of this great building, we'll begin with a little bit of history.  So which is correct? Is this building properly called Grand Central Depot, Grand Central Station, or Grand Central Terminal?  Yes, it is!  All three are correct depending on the year. 

The original 1871 building was called Grand Central Depot. It became Grand Central Station after the 1901 renovation and expansion. The new building, unveiled in 1913, is Grand Central Terminal.

Not only is Grand Central Terminal one of the world's most beautiful train stations, it's also one of New York's most fascinating landmarks. Host to more thatn 750,000 people who pass through it daily, the station is a crossroads for locals, commuters, and tourists from all over the world. The current building, built in 1913 by Cornelius Vanderbilt, was meant to symbolize wealth and power at a time when railroads were making travel easier and more comfortable than ever before. After making a fortune on steamships, Vanderbilt turned his sights to the railroad and had the beautiful, Beaux-Arts station built using sumptuous materials like Tennessee and Botticino marble, brass, opal, and Guastavino tile.

The original Grand Central Depot was conceived and built by Cornelius Vanderbilt because he had controlling interest of three of the four railroads serving the City, and wanted to expand. But the city had banned steam locomotives south of 42nd street, so Vanderbilt decided to build one huge Depot to service his three railroads, thereby expanding and making more efficient use of the railroads' finances. With 42nd Street the southern limit for steam engines, it was the logical station location. 

The Depot operated for 30 years until it simply couldn't handle capacity. In 1901, it was expanded to double it's original size, but even then it wasn't enough.

Although Grand Central Depot was splendid in its day, by the early 1900's the orginal building of 1871 had become a 19th century relic struggling to meet the demands of a 20th century city.  The 30 year-old tunnels couldn't handle the increasing traffic. The building lacked modern conveniences and signaling technology, or the infrastructure required for electric rail lines.  But it wasn't until 1902 that a tragic accident changed the course of the Depot. Two passenger trains collided in the smoke-filled Park Avenue Tunnel. People died. The city responded by extending the ban on steam engines to the entire city. This left the railroads in a jam. The solution?  Electricity.  But that meant redesigning the station.

We all know New Yorkers aren't shy. And neither are it's railroads. They were eager to proclaim their magnificence with a splendid monument—a fitting gateway to the nation’s exuberant financial, commercial, and cultural capital. Yet Grand Central Terminal was more than just a pretty façade. Behind its lofty arches and elegant marble is a marvel of practical design and innovative engineering. The station not only looked like no other, it functioned like no other, merging elegance with efficiency.

Highlight #1: Iron Eagles

Let's step to the edge of the street. Looking at the corners, we can see iron eagles perched at the corners of the building. These are vestiges of Grand Central Station, the L-shaped predecessor of Grand Central Terminal. They are imposing and massive, with wingspans 13 feet wide. There were at least 10 eagles before the station was demolished to make way for the new one in 1902, and almost all of them had disappeared. Nine have been located across the state of New York, many having been auctioned off to private estates. Some were found in backyards or as lawn ornaments, other at train stations, and one was found on a bluff overlooking the Hudson River.

image

One of the splendors of Grand Central is that its vast, majestic spaces reveal extraordinary attention to the smallest design detail. Let's walk across the street to see for ourselves!

Highlight #2:  Exterior Clock

First, looking up at the facade, we see an enormous clock. Its one of two very valuable clocks here at the terminal. This one happens to be the world's largest Tiffany clock, weighing in at 1,500 tons and spanning thirteen feet in diameter. The clock is  made of brass and stained glass, and is surrounded by a statue depicting the Roman gods Mercury, Hermes, and Minerva. The statuary is 48 feet high and was designed by French artist Jules-Felix Coutain, who refused to come to the United States to oversee the construction of his project. His reason: “I fear some of your [American] architecture would distress me.". When the clock itself was renovated, it took twelve years to complete! The stairway leading up to the clock is so narrow that the clock had to be dismantled and carried down piece by piece!

image

Highlight #3: Interior Clock

And as we step inside the terminal, we can see that there's another clock in the main hall concourse. The four-sided ball clock that sits atop the information kiosk is worth an estimated $10 million. It's four faces are made of opal set in brass with a brass acorn on top - the Vanderbilt family's symbol.

image


image

Highlight #4:  Acorns

And speaking of acorns, the Vanderbilt family motto was "Great oaks from little acorns grow."  Cornelius Vanderbilt wanted everyone to know he was responsible fo the magnificent station, so he had French artist Sylvain Salieres create decroative flourishes of bronze and stone laden with oak leaf and acorn motifs. You can spy these ornamental carvings in Vanderbilt hall to our left, on the arches reaching up to the ceiling int he main concourse here, and on the giant bronze chandeliers located throughout the station.

image

Highlight #5:  Mural Ceiling

Looking up, we're struck by the blue ceiling. The ceiling was originally meant to be a skylight, but when time and money started to run out, artist Paul Helleu came in to design the mural instead. A Columbia University astronomer confirmed the artist's design for accuracy, but it turns out the constellations are painted in reverse!  Yes, the painting of the constellations on ceiling of the massive, cathedral-like Main Concourse is backwards. No one knows for sure how the mix-up occurred, but the Vanderbilt family claimed that it was no accident; the zodiac was intended to be viewed from a divine perspective, rather than a human one, inside his temple to transportation.

image
PHOTO CEILING

As you look at the zodiac on the ceiling, look for Cancer, the crab.  You’ll find a small, dark patch of brick. This brick reveals what the station’s ceiling looked like before it was cleaned during the restoration project in 1998. What made the brick so dirty? You’d think it was soot or ash from the trains of old, but the grime is actually 70% nicotine and tar. If cigarettes can do that to a sturdy brick ceiling, just think what they can do to your lungs!

image

Highlight #6: Secret Bar

Next, we'll head down the concourse and into a narrow passageway. At the end of the hall is a stairway with a sign above that says "Campbell Apartment". Let's see what waits beyond!

Up the innocuous carpeted staircase is one of New Yorks secret bars. A dark and stately bar so hidden away in the bustling crypt of Grand Central that even time seems to have abadoned it here.  Big Band standards waft softly. Wait staff in their uniforms - white dinner jackets and black ties for the waiters, black cocktail dresses and double strand pearls for the waitresses - carry Delmonicos and potent Prohibition Punches across the slightly threadbare carpeting.Enjoy it while you can, because the longtime owner recently lost his lease, and a new trendier bar (meaning a shorts and sneakers crowd) will soon replace this iconic bar.

image

image

Now that we've seen the Main Hall, let's head deeper into the Terminal...

Highlight #7:  The Basement and The Whispering Gallery

image
The basement covers 49 acres, from 42nd to 97th street. The entire City Hall building could fit into its depth with a comfortable margin of room to spare. Today, the MTA is in the midst of an ambitious project to bring Long Island Rail Road trains into the terminal via the East Side Access Project, making Grand Central even larger and deeper. These will be the deepest train tunnels on earth, at 90 feet below the Metro North track and over 150 feet below the street. It will take 10 minutes to reach these tunnels by escalator, at their deepest point.

Nestled between the Main Concourse and Vanderbilt Hall is an acoustical architectural anomaly in Grand Central Terminal: a whispering gallery. Here, sound is thrown clear across the 2,000 sq-foot chamber, “telegraphing” across the surface of the vault and landing in faraway corners. Two people standing at opposite corners of the vaulted archway can communicate, their voices reverberating like a game of telephone that no one else can hear. The remarkable vaulted ceiling is made of Guastavino tiled arches, like the Oyster Bar, but no one knows if it was intended to create this acoustic effect.  

image
WHISPERING GALLERY

Highlight #8:  Oyster Bar

The Grand Central Oyster Bar opened in 1913, and is tucked away in this vaulted subterranean chamber of the terminal. They Oyster Bar serves overr two million bivalves a year. On a good night, it'll list 30 varieties on the chalkboard:  Moonstones from Rhode Island, Phantom Creeks from British Columbia, Meximotos from Baja, and perhaps savory Conway Cups from Prince Edward Island. Which taste - no joke - just like chicken!  Always ask the shucker behind the bar about his picks for the day!

Owner Jerome Brody says of his restaurant:  "The Oyster Bar & Restaurant with its high, vaulted ceiling and the architectural grandness of an age gone by ha an ambiance now that makes it different from any other restuarant in the world, and since people enjoy our cuisine, they come back again and again."  And for this reason, he provided everyone in the tour group with a coupon for 30% off lunch later today!


image

image

Highlight #9:  The Tennis Courts

A little known space called the Annex houses a tennis court. Originally installed by a Hungarian immigrant Geza A. Gazdag in the 1960s, it was taken over by Donald Trump, who brought the likes of John McEnroe and the Williams sisters onto its clay courts. The courts are on the fourth floor, and open to the public, so long as you're willing to pay $200-$280 per hour for use of the courts and fitness club!

image

Highlight #10:  Hidden Walkways

image
One of the closest guarded secrets is that there are walkways in the massive windows of the terminal! As you look closely, you may see a person crossing by. The walkways connect the offices above Grand Central so the employees don’t have to walk through the busy terminal.  On this tour, we have a rare opportunity to  explore the top level walkway itself, which is of glass cinderblock. You need a special key pass to get into the hallways normally. But here we are.  Shhhh!

image


Folks, this is the end of our tour. There are many more secrets and interesting factoids about Grand Central Terminal. Some you can discover on your own, and for others there is no access. Some of the most intriguing are:
- The secret elevator from the Waldorf Astoria to Track 61. Still languishing in its rusted glory is President Roosevelt's train. He would be driven to the car elevator in the Waldorf's parking garage, whisked down the shaft and into his waiting train. This was done to hide his polio from the American public.
image
- Room M42 - the hidden "guts" of Grand Central and a prime target of Hitler's during WWII. Grand Central was used for troop movements, and paralyzing Grand Central would paralyze the U.S. military war preparations.
image

- There are over 33 miles of track beneath Grand Central and surrounding buildings. The Met Life building has an escalator to it's ground floor because due to the train tunnels, the first three floors of the building are used for elevator equipment that's usually undeground!
image

I hope you've enjoyed this insiders tour of Grand Central Terminal. We could spend days here exploring the tracks, shops, the central market, and dozens of restaurants - but that's for another time!


Quote    Reply   

#44 [url]

Aug 26 16 4:47 AM

The Iota Eta Pi

New York City Weekend Whirlwind Performing Arts Tour

Your front and center seats have been reserved for some of the greatest performances in the world.

Tickets: $2500 per person, each tour is limited to 8 people 

Transportation: Travel in style all weekend in an elegant stretch limousine. The bar is stock with champagne, spirits and special treats to assure no one gets too hungry from all the applauding they will do!

image


FRIDAY Stop 1  The Metropolitan Opera

Your first stop is Lincoln Center and a matinee performance of The Metropolitan Operaimage

Upon arrival the group will take an exclusive back stage tour of the Met. Guests will get a glimpse of the final preparations of the stage crew, props and costume departments, and listen in as the chorus does its vocal warm ups.The Metropolitan Opera was founded in 1883, with its first opera house built on Broadway and 39th Street by a group of wealthy businessmen who wanted their own theater. Known as the venue for the world’s greatest voices, the Met has been under the musical direction of James Levine since 1976. Maestro Levine is credited with having created one of opera’s finest orchestras and choruses.Today the group will enjoy a performance of Puccini’s La Boheme starring Piotr Beczała, and Michael Fabiano, as the young Parisian lovers at the center of the story.
image 


Stop 2  Café Carlyle

Following the opera everyone will be ready for a late night meal and a little lighter entertainment.Both will be found at the supper club CAFÉ CARLYLE where our group will enjoy the music of Woody Allen & the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band
image 


SATURDAY

Stop 3  Jazz Inspired

The group will ease into the day with a visit to the NPR Studios to hear the recording of Judy Carmichael’s Jazz Inspired.     image      What inspires the people who inspire you? How do creative people create?

Each week world-renowned jazz pianist Judy Carmichael explores these questions with her guests, celebrated artists who discuss their creative process and how their passion for jazz has inspired their work. They share their favorite recordings with the listeners as well as insight into their life and art.Today Judy will be interviewing Marilyn Maye. 88 years young, Marilyn performs with the energy a 40-year-old would envy and a talent that Johnny Carson honored a record 70 times on his "Tonight Show." 


Stop 4 Gershwin Theatre Broadway

After a light lunch the group will attend a matinee of the Broadway hit musical WICKED!  image   

WICKED looks at what happened in the Land of Oz... but from a different angle. Long before Dorothy arrives, there is another young woman, born with emerald-green skin-smart, fiery, misunderstood, and possessing an extraordinary talent. When she meets a bubbly blonde, their initial rivalry turns into the unlikeliest of friendships... until the world decides to call one “good,” and the other one “wicked.”


                                                                                                       image

The group will be taken back to their hotel for a chance to rest, have dinner and put on their finery for the evenings entertainment

Stop 5 The New York Philharmonic Orchestra.

Tonight you'll attend a concert of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras. The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace

Tonight’s program features Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto with soloist Lisa Batiashvili. The orchestra will also perform  Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9, From the New World. 

Stop 6 Don’t Tell Mama

Our late evening stop will be at the famous piano bar Don’t Tell Mama. Established in 1982, Don't Tell Mama has celebrated over 30 years as a world famous entertainment destination; located on renowned Restaurant Row in the heart of New York’s theater district. In addition to the scheduled performers, patrons are invited to perform at the open mike which also attracts Broadway and off Broadway musical actors who are known to stop by and treat the crowd to a special song or two.

SUNDAY  - GOTTA DANCE!

Stop 7 Tap it Out

Our first stop of the day will be at a special TAP IT OUT performance by students of TAP CITY and The American Tap Foundation

These special performances pop up in locations around the city including the financial district and Time Square.  We won’t know till that morning where the day’s performance will be!  
image


Stop 8 Dance Theatre of Harlem Company
image

Today’s matinee performance will the Dance Theatre of Harlem Company at York College in Jamaica Queens.The company consists of 14 racially diverse dance artists who perform an eclectic, demanding repertoire. From treasured classics, neo-classical works by George Balanchine and resident choreographer Robert Garland, cutting edge contemporary works and works that use the language of ballet to celebrate African American culture, the Company brings new life to the art form of classical ballet. 


Stop 9 Lincoln Center and The New York City Ballet

For your final stop we will return to Lincoln Center to see  the New York City Ballet at the David H Koch TheaterIn the 1930s ballet enthusiast Lincoln Kirstein decided to promote the idea of an American ballet company that would train its own American dancers and be on a par with celebrated European companies. He met the legendary choreographer George Balanchine in 1933 and brought him to New York to help found the company in 1948.Tonight the tour will see the ballet classic Swan Lake.
 image


To end the weekend on a high note, guests will be transported back to their hotels by horse drawn carriages with a loop through Central Park allowing them to pause and reflect on all the sights and sounds of the tour.

I hope you enjoyed this preview of our Weekend Worldwind of Performing Arts and will join us soon in the Big Apple for a tour that is sure to delight even the harshest  of critics!


Quote    Reply   

#45 [url]

Aug 26 16 5:53 AM

JostLori wrote:
image

                                                                      BIG APPLE ADVENTURE TOURS  
                                            YOUR NOT SO ORDINARY TOUR OF GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL                                            

Tour Type:             Walking Tour
Destination:          Grand Central Terminal 
Departs:                10:00 am from the street-level atrium at 120 Park Avenue (SW corner of East 42nd St and Park Ave) directly across street from Terminal
Returns:                12:00 pm
Cost:                     $30 per person
  
Start of Tour:
Our tour focuses not only on the archtectural highlights of the Terminal, but provides a real story about little known secrets, anecdotes, archival material, and the History of the Terminal. Most people touring see the trains and the shops  - but that's too ordinary for us!  You will not see Grand Central with the same eyes after taking our tour!

image


Wow, JostLori.  That was quite interesting.  I've seen documentaries about Grand Central Station, but I didn't know there were so many hidden treasures to be explored.  Thanks for the great report!

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#46 [url]

Aug 26 16 6:00 AM

momaphet wrote:
The Iota Eta Pi

New York City Weekend Whirlwind Performing Arts Tour

Your front and center seats have been reserved for some of the greatest performances in the world.

Tickets: $2500 per person, each tour is limited to 8 people 

Transportation: Travel in style all weekend in an elegant stretch limousine. The bar is stock with champagne, spirits and special treats to assure no one gets too hungry from all the applauding they will do!

image       


What fantastic entertainment abounds in New York City!  Thanks for the great report, momaphet.  I feel like I saw it all!

  Northwestgal

Quote    Reply   

#47 [url]

Aug 26 16 8:06 AM

Big Apple Adventures Challenge 

Alexander Hamilton Walking Tour with Charter to Hamilton Grange and Optional Broadway Show 

Beginning Point: Battery Park

Points of Interest:  
Kings College (Columbia University), Fraunces Tavern, Bowling Green, Federal Hall, Morris-Jumel Mansion, Trinity Church, Hamilton Grange, Hamilton the Musical

Departs: 10:00 am 
Returns: 12:00 pm

Cost of Walking Tour: $25 per person

Optional Charter to Hamilton Grange:  $25 per person departing at 1:30 pm

Broadway Show - Hamilton the Musical:  $125 for 6:00 pm showing


image

Alexander Hamilton was born illegitimate on a remote Caribbean island where he was orphaned at an early age.  At 19 years of age he came to New York to further his education at Kings College.  In Hamilton's time New York City only occupied the southern end of Manhattan. To the north were country estates with farmland in between.  Most of the placed Hamilton frequented are well within walking distance of each other.         


Starting Point - Battery Park


image

From Battery Park can be seen the Statue of Liberty.  As a Founding Father, this magnificent statue represents what our original Patriots fought for. 


Next Stop - Kings College (Columbia University)


image


Although his journey from the West Indies was sponsored so he could further his education in America, the young Hamilton, barely in his twenties, dropped out of King’s College in 1775 to fight in the Revolutionary War. (The college changed its name to Columbia University after the British defeat.) When Hamilton attended the institution, it was located in College Hall, which was built on a plot of land northwest of the city’s Common (today’s City Hall Park), bound by the present-day Murray, Church, Barclay, and Greenwich Streets. (It was demolished in 1857.) In 1908, Hamilton’s alma mater honored him with the bronze statue that now commands the entrance of Hamilton Hall located on the east side of the university’s current location on Manhattan’s Upper West Side at 116th Street and Amsterdam Avenue.


Next Stop - Fraunces Tavern


 image


Located at 54 Pearl Street at the corner of Broad Street, Fraunces Tavern originally bore the name of Queen Charlotte (the young bride of King George III); the public house eventually took on the name of its proprietor and figured prominently in the war against the British. Fraunces Tavern’s Long Room was the scene of Washington’s emotional farewell to the Continental Army on December 4, 1783, just more than a week after the last British soldiers left New York. In 1785 the tavern was leased to the Continental Congress for three years and housed several government departments, including Hamilton’s Treasury Department. On July 4, 1804, both Hamilton and Aaron Burr attended a banquet hosted by the Society of the Cincinnati, an order of retired officers from the Revolutionary War, just a week before their infamous duel. Today only a few structural walls of the original building remain; the tavern was rebuilt in the Colonial Revival style by the Sons of Liberty, who purchased the property in 1904. It now includes two restaurants in addition to several rooms of museum space. The famous Long Room is re-created with colonial artifacts to conjure up its Revolutionary past. 



Next Stop - Bowling Green
imageThe moment when General Washington read out the newly minted Declaration of Independence to his troops in New York in July 1776, a mob of soldiers and nationalists rushed to Bowling Green, a city park since 1733, and tore down the gilded statue of the tone-deaf British monarch from its marble pedestal. The statue was decapitated and the king’s head stuck on a spike; the lead from the sculpture was melted down to make ammunition for the Revolutionary War. The park’s original metal fence was removed in 1914 when a subway station was built near the site, but was later discovered intact in storage and re-erected on the original site. When you visit Bowling Green park today, at the foot of Broadway, Whitehall Street, and State Street, you can still see where the 18th century patriots sawed the decorative crowns off the tops of the fence posts in their defiance of the British. The destruction of George III’s statue and its historical import inspired German artist Johannes Adam Simon Oertel to paint the scene, albeit with considerable poetic license. The original is part of the collection of the New-York Historical Society and is currently on display at the Society’s galleries at 170 Central Park West, along with a surviving fragment from the tail of the equestrian statue. 


Next Stop - Federal Hall



image


Washington was inaugurated as the country’s first president amid great fanfare at Federal Hall, located at 28 Wall Street. The building itself was torn down and replaced by the U.S. Customs House in 1842. The current Greek Revival–style building now functions as the Federal Hall National Memorial. You can see two artifacts preserved from Hamilton’s era: the Bible upon which the country’s first president took his oath of office, and a stone tile from the balcony where Washington stood for the ceremony on April 30, 1789.


image


A five-minute detour from Federal Hall will take you to 59 Maiden Lane, a sprawling office tower whose claim to fame is the plaque on one side of the building, which marks the house, at number 57, where Thomas Jefferson lived while he served as the first secretary of state. Jefferson loathed his time here; he described New York City as “a cloacina of all the depravities of human nature.” It was in this house that he, James Madison, and Hamilton worked out the compromise of 1790 whereby the federal government assumed all state debts in return for establishing a permanent capital along the shores of the Potomac. The deal had far-reaching consequences, but, as Burr enviously notes in the musical, “No one else was in the room where it happened.” 


Next Stop - Morris-Jumel Mansion



image


In July 1790, Washington hosted a dinner for his Cabinet members and their families, who included Hamilton, Jefferson, Henry Knox, and John Adams, at Manhattan’s oldest surviving historic home. It is now known as the Morris-Jumel Mansion and is located at 65 Jumel Terrace, near 160th Street and Edgecombe Avenue. The celebratory dinner commemorated one of the first victories of the Revolutionary War — the Battle of Harlem Heights, in 1776 — during which Washington, with Hamilton as his aide, headquartered in the house. Being sited on the second highest hill on the island of Manhattan, it commanded an unobstructed view of New York Harbor. By a strange coincidence of history, the man who was responsible for Hamilton’s death, Aaron Burr, also lived at the Morris-Jumel house when he was briefly married, at age 77, to the widow Eliza Jumel who was believed at the time to be the wealthiest woman in the nation. Lin-Manuel Miranda was given the opportunity to actually work in Burr’s own bedroom while he was working on his musical.  When she decided to divorce Burr, she hired Hamilton's son to represent her.  Aaron Burr passed away on the day the divorce was finalized. The view across the Hudson River from Weehawken, New Jersey, is spectacular, but on that fateful dawn on July 11, 1804, Alexander Hamilton wasn’t there for the view. His appointment was with Aaron Burr. Vice President Burr had challenged his archrival to a duel for allegedly imputing his honor. Was it murder, suicide, or just plain bad luck? Why did Hamilton throw away his shot by shooting in the air? Historians will probably never agree. But Hamilton, age 49, was mortally wounded and died a day later.
 

End - Trinity Church



image


Hamilton’s funeral on July 14, 1804, is reported to have been a very solemn occasion. He was buried on the south side of Trinity Church, bordering Rector Street. The church itself, at 79 Broadway at Wall Street, is the third building to be constructed on this site, consecrated in 1846. Eliza Schuyler Hamilton outlived her husband by 50 years. She tirelessly worked to preserve her late husband’s legacy, particularly during the years when he was being vilified by the likes of John Adams, who called Hamilton an “indefatigable and unprincipled intriguer.” When she died in 1854, she was buried next to her husband in Trinity Churchyard.
 

Optional Charter to Hamilton Grange



image


Unlike his fellow founding fathers, Hamilton didn’t come from landed gentry. His “sweet project,” as he called it, was The Grange, a two-story frame Federal-style house that he built on 35 acres of farmland 9 miles north of his law offices in Lower Manhattan. But he got to live in it for just two years until his untimely death in 1804. Eliza Hamilton continued to live at The Grange until it was sold in 1833 and she moved to Washington, D.C. Originally sited on an elevation that provided views of the Hudson River on the west and the Harlem and East Rivers on the east, The Grange was relocated in 1889 to make way for the extension of the Manhattan grid. The original structure was moved 250 feet by horse-drawn carriage to Convent Avenue near 141st Street; it remained there until 2008, when it was moved to its present location at the north end of St. Nicholas Park — this time with the benefit of computerized hydraulics. A careful five-year restoration that replaced lost design features and décor was completed in 2011. Most of the furniture on display, with the notable exception of the piano, are faithful reproductions. When you walk through the study, dining room, and parlor of The Grange today, you can get a sense of how Hamilton might have spent the last two years of his life. The green-walled study (a particularly expensive and unusual shade of paint in its day) contains a few books from his original library — volumes on history and economics that, though rebound in later years, carry the signatures of Hamilton and his wife on the flyleaves — as well as a replica of his portable desk (a lap-desk, if you will). In the yellow-walled octagonal dining room, graced with mirrored doors and majestic French windows, the silver centerpiece on the dining table is an original family heirloom. And of particular interest is the wine cooler — a replica of the gift sent to Hamilton in 1797 from the retired George Washington as a gesture of friendship.


image

Alexander Hamilton's Wine Cooler

image

Lucy's Wine Cooler(s)

Last Edited By: threeovens Aug 26 16 8:10 AM. Edited 1 time.

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help