#21 [url]

Aug 15 16 5:59 AM

Susie D wrote:
Vickie,
Your report on Ellis Island is 5 star worthy. I'm ready to buy my ticket to your Big Apple Adventure now!


Thank you, Susie.  I really enjoyed the research.  This was a really fun challenge.

  Northwestgal

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#22 [url]

Aug 17 16 3:15 AM

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On behalf of the Sisters of the Traveling Pans, I'll do a Big Apple Adventure.
I'd like to do a combo of public art and monuments and Harlem (which has a lot of art itself).
 

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#23 [url]

Aug 17 16 6:20 AM

Leggy Peggy wrote:
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On behalf of the Sisters of the Traveling Pans, I'll do a Big Apple Adventure.
I'd like to do a combo of public art and monuments and Harlem (which has a lot of art itself).

 

That sounds like an exciting adventure tour. I look forward to it! 

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#26 [url]

Aug 18 16 1:58 PM

Private Guided Tour of the Bronx

Cost $50 per person for the day.  We will be stopping for lunch and dinner breaks.   Food is paid for by the tourist.

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We start our tour of the Bronx at the Bronx Botanical Garden.
Here is our wonderful tram that is taking us on our tour.


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Bronx Botanical Garden

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Bronx Botanical Gardens is one of the largest and oldest in the country. Amid the 250 acres of this botanical beauty you'll find over 40 acres of New York City's original forest, a river and cascading waterfall, undulating hills, wetlands, ponds, and more. Special attractions include display gardens, walking trails, and the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, a landmark turn of the century crystal palace which houses jungles, deserts, a palm court, fern forest, and seasonal displays. The Everett Children's Adventure Garden is a 12-acre indoor/outdoor science exploration wonderland for kids with forty hands-on nature discovery activities, mazes, galleries, topiaries, and more. Special events take place year round. It's also a National Historic Landmark.[color=#000000]The Botanical Garden is open year-round (it is closed on Mondays). Its gorgeous exhibitions, arboretum collections, greenhouses, dining facilities and special events are enjoyed by visitors from around the world.


Next stop the Bronx Zoo right next door.
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Bronx Zoo

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Beloved by New Yorkers, the Bronx Zoo is the largest urban zoo in the country, and the heart of the Wildlife Conservation Society and its work to save wildlife and wild places around the globe. It is home to more than 4,000 animals representing more than 600 species in specialized environments. Plus they offer a comprehensive program of visitor experiences.  The Bronx Zoo spans 265 acres of wildlife habitats and attractions and is open year-round.



Bronx Museum of the Arts

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The Bronx Museum of the Arts specializes in contemporary art and features special and permanent exhibitions in all media. On the first Wednesday of every month (except September and January), The Bronx Trolley: First Wednesday Arts and Culture Tour  provides a free tour of the hottest cultural attractions, dining establishments and entertainment venues along the Museum’s Grand Concourse neighborhood.



Edgar Allan Poe Cottage 


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Edgar Allan Poe spent the last years of his life, from 1846 to 1849, in The Bronx at Poe Cottage, now located at Kingsbridge Road and the Grand Concourse. A small wooden farmhouse built about 1812, the cottage once commanded unobstructed vistas over the rolling Bronx hills to the shores of Long Island. It was a bucolic setting in which the great writer penned many of his most enduring poetical works, including “Annabel Lee,” “The Bells” and “The Cask of Amontillado.”



Bartow-Pell mansion 

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The Bartow-Pell mansion is the only survivor of more than a dozen architectural gems overlooking Long Island Sound. The story of the Bartow-Pell estate begins in 1654 when Thomas Pell, an English doctor from Connecticut, bought the land from the Siwanoy Indians as part of a nearly 9,000-acre tract. The estate was reduced to 220 acres by the end of the Revolutionary War. It was bought in 1836 by Robert Bartow who built the present Grecian style stone mansion with Greek Revival interiors. He moved into the house with his wife and children in 1842. The Bartow-Pell Mansion opened as a museum in 1946.  It's part of the Historic House Trust of New York City



Van Cortlandt House

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The Van Cortlandt House Museum, also known as Frederick Van Cortlandt House or Van Cortlandt House, is the oldest building in The Bronx, New York City. The house was built in the Georgian Style by Frederick Van Cortlandt (1699–1749) in 1748 for his family. Van Cortlandt died before its completion and the property was inherited by his son, James Van Cortlandt (1727–1787). It is a 2 1⁄2-story, L-shaped house with a double hipped roof. It was built in 1748 of dressed fieldstone and is representative of the high Georgian style.  The Van Cortlandts, a mercantile family prominent in New York affairs, established a grain plantation and grist mill on the property. The house was used during the Revolutionary War by Rochambeau, Lafayette, and Washington.




Little Italy at Arthur Avenue

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Arthur Avenue is a street in the Belmont section of the Bronx, New York City's northernmost borough.  It was once the heart of the Bronx's "Little Italy, "Little Italy" generally refers to Arthur Avenue and East 187th Street.  Although the historical and commercial center of Little Italy is Arthur Avenue itself, the area stretches across East 187th Street from Arthur Avenue to Prospect Avenue, and is similarly lined with delis, bakeries, cafes and various Italian merchants. Unlike the ''Little Italy'' neighborhood in Manhattan, which has become mostly a tourist trap, the Bronx's ''Little Italy'' is considered ''The real Little Italy'' due to its Italian immigrant heritage which dates back to the 1950s. Arthur Avenue and Morris Park are viewed as the Bronx's primary Italian-American communities. Other Italian-American communities in the Bronx are the middle and upper-class neighborhoods of Schuylerville and Country Club.

 



Yankee Stadium Tour

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How about a tour? Highlights of the Classic Tour, which lasts about one hour with a capacity of 100 people, include: Discussion of Yankee history; Field access; Dugout visit area; Press Box; Monument Park; and the Clubhouse. Special group tours are also available.
Yankee Stadium is the home ballpark for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB) and the home stadium for New York City FC of Major League Soccer(MLS). A new, state-of-the-art venue, it can seat over 50,000 and includes a museum. 



City Island


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When people think of the Bronx, they don't usually think charming, historic, water-side community. But, there it is. City Island, a small island surrounded by the waters of the Long Island Sound and Eastchester Bay. The main street, City Island Avenue, is fringed with Victorian homes dating back to the 1800s when it was a thriving shipbuilding and yachting center (think America's Cup). Today boaters on the north shore of Long Island frequently sail up there for a seafood dinner and a stroll around town. You don't have to have a boat to reach it. Cars do fine over the land route.
 

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Last Edited By: Lavender Lynn Aug 18 16 2:02 PM. Edited 2 times.

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#27 [url]

Aug 19 16 7:00 AM

What a nice tour of the Bronx Lynn!
I had no idea about Edgar Allan Poe having lived there. I can still quote lines from Annabel Lee and The raven. My high school teacher would be proud. LOL

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#28 [url]

Aug 19 16 11:29 AM

I am so interested in all of New York City, it was really fun to study a new part like the Bronx.    This is the kind of thing that is my favorite part of CQ.
I am so amazed at all the challenges you think of.   You really think outside the box.

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#31 [url]

Aug 21 16 7:12 AM

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The newly-formed Twisted Sisters Tour Group proudly announces that plans have been finalized for their Maiden Guided Tour & that it will include the remarkable sights & sounds of Rockefeller Plaza plus an added bonus feature to include sites related to the role played by the TV & Movie Industry in the New York City economy & cultural scene.  

Tour Type - Luxury Tour Bus                     
Tour Itinerary - See Attched Brochure
Tour Date - Sunday, August 28, 2016
Departure Schedule - The Tour Departs at 10 am from the Rockefeller Center Designated Landmark dated 1989 & pictured in Stop #1 below. 

Return Schedule - Your Tour Bus will return you to the same spot at 4 pm   
Cost Per Person - $60 with a 20% Discount Available to Culinary Quest #3 Participants
Entertainment - The Twisted Sisters will Line-Dance Rockette-Style (Choreography by Nancy's Pantry)
Preview -  imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

Your Transport -

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~ ~ TOUR BROCHURE ~ ~


Stop #1 - 
The Art & History of Rockefeller Plaza - Sculptural art in & around Rockefeller Plaza plus historical landmarks will be featured at Stop #1 where we will all meet & begin the Tour.
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Stop #2 - 
The Top of the Rock - Discover The Top of the Rock Observation Deck & experience breathtaking views of New York City & beyond. The excitement begins on the ground floor & mezzanine with a dazzling Swarovski crystal chandelier and multi-media exhibit full of the rich history, art & architecture of Rockefeller Center. Step on 1 of our glass ceiling sky shuttles for a thrilling ride to the Top, where you will find 3 stories of spectacular views, including a stunning open-air 360-degree view from the 70th Floor Outdoor Deck.
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Stop #3 - This tour stop offers a choice for our Tour guests & both will be fa
st-paced. You will enter the NBC Broadcast Studio & choose a 40 minute "Meet & Greet" with the cast & crew of "Days of our Lives" or "The Today Show". Both shows have been a part of our TV viewing history for decades. The Today Show debuted on 11-14-52 as a news & talk show while Days of our Lives entered our lives on 11-8-65 as a new daytime drama (aka "soap opera"), but soap operas had already been around for 35 years at that point, having first begun on the radio in 1930.
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Stop #4 - 
A generous amount of time (1 hour) has been allowed for your Brunch dining pleasure at the iconic Rainbow Room. Following a hiatus, the Rainbow Room has recently reopened with its unparalleled 65th-floor vistas intact. Although mostly reserved for private parties, it is now open to the public for a decadent Sunday brunch buffet. Outdoor seating is available on request and there is an observation deck where pictures can be taken of the breathtaking panoramic views of the New York City Skyline.
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Stop #5 - Museum of Modern Art - We are proud to include this stop as part of our first Guided Tour as the MOMA is considered by many to have the best collection of modern Western masterpieces in the world. MOMA's holdings include more than 150,000 individual pieces in addition to approximately 22,000 films & 4 million film stills. Tour guides will move the Tour group quickly here to allow this cultural phenomenon the attention it commands.
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Stop #6 - Radio City Music Hall - Home of the Rockettes - This will be a liesurely stop for the Tour as you'll be allowed to choose a relaxing beverage & snack break, tour the facility with your Guide or potentially meet a Rockette in costume to admire. 
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Stop #7 - Christmas at Rockefeller Plaza - We know you are taking this Tour in the warmth of summer weather in New York City & may feel deprived of the special time each year when Christmas Tree lights sparkle, bells ring, children are on their best behavior & they skate happily on the ice rink even if falls occur. Your Tour Guides will walk w/you around the Plaza & try to give you a feel for that time, point out areas of special interest & share the history of how the tradition of the Tree began in 1931 outside of St. Patrick's Cathedral. For the past 12 years, a giant Swarovski Star comprised of 25,000 crystals & weighing 550 lbs has topped the Christmas tree & it always stays atop the tree for the remainder of the holiday season. ... Your Tour Guide will give you a small gift portfolio from Twisted Sisters Tour Group as a visual reminder of that time in history, how the tradition has changed through the years & your time spent on this Tour 8-28-16.
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Stop #8 - "Stop & Shop Until You Drop Op" - For the final hour of your guided Tour, the Bus will deliver you to the entrance of the Rockefeller Plaza Underground Shopping Concourse where you will be divided into 9 groups & accompanied by 1 of the Sisters Guides while you shop for gifts, souvenirs or personal items. A list of the shops & their locations will be provided & the Sisters will cater to your every whim. When your shopping hour is over, the Bus will return the Tour group to the original departure location -- Unless you prefer continued shopping.
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~~ Television & Movies in New York City ~~

The Entertainment & Performing Arts industries thrive in New York City. There is The Metropolitan Opera House (aka "The Met"), The New York City Ballet, The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Radio City Music Hall (Our Tour Stop #6), Broadway & Off-Broadway, just to name a select few. They continue to be popular destinations for the locals & the tourist trade as well. They are also an important part of the New York City economy & a signifcant source of jobs. However, the television & film industries cannot be ignored. The film industry was first to make New York City it's 2nd home as early as the 1930's & then the television small screen hit the scene with a splash. Both are now taking big bites out of the West Coast domination. The list of movies & TV programs that were either set in New York City or actually filmed on location there are staggering. Your Tour Guide will call your attention to as many of these sites as possible while your Tour is in progress. The following is a tiny Photo Gallery of some examples.

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.............................."Friends"....................................."NYPD Blue"................................."The Sopranos"

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"Sex and the City"................."I Love Lucy"................................"Sesame Street"............................"30 Rock" at the "Rock"

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............................................."When Harry Met Sally" - Katz's..."On The Town" - Rockefeller Plaza


Last Edited By: twissis Aug 21 16 3:22 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#33 [url]

Aug 22 16 12:18 AM

twissis wrote:
Susie - I edited my report slightly this morning when I saw a couple of typos more clearly in the light of day. image


Your adventure is a fast paced day for sure! People will feel like they saw a lot and more than got their money's worth! image

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#35 [url]

Aug 23 16 4:03 AM

 Give My Regards to Broadway 

Question: Why is Broadway referred to as “The Great White Way?”  Read and find out! image   

Our “free” walking tour starts at 1 PM. We’ll meet outside of ABC studios in Times Square. The tour is called free, because we will pay our tour guide at the end of the tour based on what a good job s/he did. Guides tend to be actors from Broadway and surroundings.  ($30 per person is about average.) It should take about 2 hours and cover about 1 mile. 
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Our tour guide points out the Times Square building - one of the iconic sights of NYC. This is the building that started it all when the New York Times decided to move its headquarters to this underdeveloped neighborhood at 43rd Street and Broadway in the late 19th century. The 1904 opening coincided with the opening of a new subway station to be dubbed Times Square after the newspaper and this with the rapid growth of theaters in the area gave rise to America’s most important entertainment center and its greatest stars of theater, musicals, movies, and television. Look up high and we will see the Waterford crystal ball lit up by LED lights above, viewed by millions every New Year’s Eve as it descends its post at the top of the building.

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First Stop: Paramount Theater (Broadway at 44th Street) 
Built in 1926 as part of a larger office building, the Paramount was built to be the largest, most opulent movie palace in New York. It also featured live entertainment including in the 1940s a young singing sensation from New Jersey named Frank Sinatra who packed the house with swooning teenage girls
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2nd Stop: Shubert Alley (225 West 44th Street to 45th Street) 
Named after the famed Broadway theater impresarios, the Shubert Brothers, this alley and the two streets it connects, 44th and 45th, are home to numerous beautiful and famous theaters managed by the brothers which have produced some of the most iconic plays and musicals in American history. On 44th Street we’ll see the Shubert (A Chorus Line), St. James (Oklahoma, Hello Dolly), the Majestic (Phantom), the Broadhurst (Cabaret) theaters and Sardi’s, the iconic Broadway stars restaurant. We’ll walk up Shubert Alley to 45th Street to the Booth Theater.

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=12px(Linky once played Aunt Eller in Oklahoma! - but in Community Theater, not Broadway!)

  3rd Stop: The Booth Theater (222 West 45th Street) 

Known for (Sunday in the Park with George, Butterflies Are Free) This beautiful 1920s theater was named after Edwin Booth, 19th century America’s most famous Shakespearean actor and brother to Abraham Lincoln’s assassin, John Wilkes Booth.
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4th Stop: Marriott Marquis (1535 Broadway, between 45th and 46th Streets)  
This towering hotel over Times Square with a lobby 8 floors above street level required the demolition of several historic and beloved Broadway theaters in the 1980s, an act dubbed the “Broadway Massacre” by New York theater lovers.  The new building featured a new theater on its ground floor, the Marquis. However, almost every Broadway show to open there has failed, leading to a belief in a curse on the theater for having been founded on the destruction of earlier theaters. By the way, there are a lot of superstitions and ghosts in the theater tradition. For example the well known expression “Break a leg!” said to a performer about to enter the stage is based on the belief that if you wish them something good, the opposite will happen and vice-versa. Also, never whistle or say the name “Macbeth” in a theater; it brings bad luck!

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=12px(You guessed it - Linky was in this one, too!)  

5th Stop: Lunt-Fontanne Theater (205 West 46th Street) 
 

Designed by the same architects (Carriere and Hastings) who built the New York Public Library, this beautiful Beaux Art theater is named for the husband and wife Broadway theater legends Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne. Formerly known as the Globe, it featured the Broadway debut of Fred and Adele Astaire in 1919 in Adele, and more recently has presented revivals of the Sound of Music, Beauty and the Beast, and The Little Mermaid. It originally featured a unique sliding oval roof that could be opened to let in fresh air and moonlight.   image


  6th Stop: Duffy Square and Statue of George M. Cohan: (46th Street at Broadway and 7th Ave) Two of America’s favorite Irish-Americans stand over the TKTS tickets booth at the very heart of Times Square. Father Duffy was an Irish Chaplain and military hero as part of New York City’s all Irish 69=10pxth Regiment, “The Fighting Irish” in the Spanish-American War and in World War I. He was the local priest of the neighborhood when it was a heavily Irish immigrant working class and was one of the few priests willing to give the sacrament to actors and theater people working nearby (long considered to be as lowly as prostitutes or criminals in late 19=10pxth century society).  The George M. Cohan statue stands just south of Father Duffy. Immortalized by Jimmy Cagney in the film “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” Cohan was the first major Broadway star as an actor, songwriter, and playwright.  Author of “Give My Regards to Broadway”, “You’re a Grand Old Flag” and dozens of other American standards, he is the only musical theater actor to be honored with a statue in New York City. image  

7th Stop: Actors Temple (Cong. Ezrath Israel) (339 West 47th St between 8th and 9th Avenues)  
This humble synagogue, founded in 1917 for the working class Jewish population of Hell’s Kitchen, became the place of worship for numerous stars of Broadway, film, and television, including the 3 Stooges, the Marx Brothers, Shelly Winters, Jerry Lewis, Oscar Hammerstein and many more.  It is still a functioning synagogue, which also offers performances and classes in theater. 

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  8th Stop: St Malachy’s Chapel- The Actors Chapel (239 West 49th Street) 
Like the Actors Temple on 47th Street, St. Malachy’s Roman Catholic Church opened in 1902 to cater to a working class community in the area and then later welcomed some of Broadway’s and Hollywood’s most notable stars as well as many other actors and theater workers. Rudolf Valentino, Joan Crawford, Bob Hope, and Florence Henderson are just a few of the stars who attended services at St. Malachy’s. It still caters to the theater community as reflected in a special mass late Saturday night for actors who perform in Sunday matinees. 
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From St. Malachy’s we will walk back to the TKTS Booth at Broadway and 47th Street. This will conclude our official tour but those who wish to, will be able to buy discount tickets to a Broadway show! Hopefully, we’ll enjoy our tour and give our guide a generous gratuity! 
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What shall we see? Waitress of course - it’s about food! image 

And while we wait for our show, we’ll be able to check out the Naked Cowboy as he entertains the crowds in Times Square!   image 



Answer from above:
The Great White Way is a nickname for a section of Broadway in the Midtown section of New York City, specifically the portion that encompasses the Theatre District, between 42nd and 53rd Streets. Nearly a mile of Broadway was illuminated in 1880 by Brush arc lamps, making it among the first electrically lighted streets in the United States. The headline "Found on the Great White Way" appeared in the February 3, 1902, edition of the New York Evening Telegram. The journalistic sobriquet was inspired by the millions of lights on theatre marquees and billboard advertisements that illuminate the area, especially around Times Square.

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#37 [url]

Aug 25 16 5:13 AM

After a very successful Guided Tour led by Twissis, The Sisters of The Travelling Pans had arranged their second day of touring New York City. 

Today will focus on the Art Deco architecture of this magnificent city. Art Deco architecture wasn't reserved for just high profile buildings; it proliferated throughout all five boroughs, making New York "the best city to explore the splendor" of the style. While we will see some of the easily recognizable structures we will also be introduced to some of the lesser known buildings of the period. 

Tour Type – Luxury Tour Bus retained from yesterdays trip
Tour Itinerary – Per attached brochure
Tour Date – August 29, 2016
Departure – 9 am from #1 Wall Street shown in the tour brochure below
Tour End – The Sisters will be taken by the coach from the last Art Deco stop at Ridgewood Savings bank to Yankee Stadium where they will see a baseball game at Yankee Stadium
Cost per person - $120 which includes tickets to the ball game.  A light lunch will be provided mid-day.
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~Tour Brochure~ Prior to embarking on the bus we will visit One Wall Street.

One Wall Street (originally the Irving Trust Company Building, then the Bank Of New York Building after 1988, and now known as the BNY Mellon Building since 2007), is an Art Deco -style skyscraper in Lower Manhattan, New York city. It is located in Manhattan's Financial Districton the corner of Wall Street and Broadway.
Designed by Ralph Walker, the building was originally built for the Irving Trust Company. It has a steel skeleton whose facade is covered in Limestone. Because of the curves in the wall, the bank does not completely occupy its full building lot, and by law the unoccupied and unmarked land reverts to the public, but for a number of small markers embedded in the sidewalk asserting the limits of the building's lot. It counts fifty stories and is 654 feet (199 meters) tall, and measures 1,165,659 rentable square feet.The Wall Street entrance leads into a two-story banking hall whose ceiling is decorated with red and gold mosaics designed by Hildreth Meiere, comparable to the mosaics in the Golden Hall of Stockholm City Hall, and manufactured by the same company, the Ravenna Mosiac Company.
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A short bus ride will take us to our next destination at 29 Broadway.

The building was finished in 1931 and was built by Sloan & Robertson. The design and ornament of 29 Broadway may not be as bold as some other buildings, but they are no less pleasing and handsome. The structure’s slenderness is just part of its soaring quality, thanks to the smooth cream surface; a vertical band of narrow windows up the middle above the entrance, flanked to the left by alternating horizontal black bands of windows; and a series of dramatic setbacks at the top. The exterior has floral and geometric patterned screens, carved trim, and a beautifully sculpted entrance. The exterior vestibule on Broadway especially mesmerizes, with marble in an alternate pattern of horizontal and vertical lines; silver metal trimming; and a dazzling mosaic ceiling. Art Deco detail abound.
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The instantly recognizable Chrysler Building is our next stop.

The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco-style skyscraperlocated on the East Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue in the Turtle Bay neighborhood. At 1,046 feet (319 m), the structure was the world's tallest building for 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931. The Chrysler Building was designed by architect William Van Alen for a project of Walter P. Chrysler. When the ground breaking occurred on September 19, 1928, there was an intense competition in New York City to build the world's tallest skyscraper. Despite a frantic pace (the building was built at an average rate of four floors per week), no workers died during the construction of this skyscraper.
Van Alen's original design for the skyscraper called for a decorative jewel-like glass crown. It also featured a base in which the showroom windows were tripled in height and topped by 12 stories with glass-wrapped corners, creating an impression that the tower appeared physically and visually light as if floating in mid-air. The height of the skyscraper was also originally designed to be 246 meters (807 ft). but it was eventually revised to be 282 m (925 ft) tall. As Walter Chrysler was the chairman of the Chrysler Corporation and intended to make the building into Chrysler's headquarters, various architectural details and especially the building's gargoyles were modeled after Chrysler automobile products like the hood ornaments of the Plymouth; they exemplify the machine age in the 1920s
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Our fourth stop will be the Hotel Waldorf Astoria.

An icon of glamour and luxury, the current Waldorf Astoria is one of the world's most prestigious and best known hotels.  The Hotel Grew Out of a Family Feud
No one would have guessed back in the 1890s that two rich, feuding cousins would have created one of the most lasting names in the hotel business. In the 1920s, the decision was made to move uptown and the land was sold to the developers of the Empire State Building. The brand-new Waldorf Astoria hotel opened on October 1, 1931 and immediately made history — it was the largest and tallest hotel i
n the world at the time. It spans an entire city block on Park and Lexington Avenue between 49th and 50th streets

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 Just prior to moving on to the Radio City Music Hall a light lunch will be provided.
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When the stock market crashed in 1929, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. held a $91 million, 24-year lease on a piece of midtown Manhattan property properly known as "the speakeasy belt." Rockefeller made a bold decision that would leave a lasting impact on the city's architectural and cultural landscape. He decided to build an entire complex of buildings on the property-buildings so superior that they would attract commercial tenants even in a depressed city flooded with vacant rental space. The project would express the highest ideals of architecture and design and stand as a symbol of optimism and hope.The search for a commercial partner led to the Radio Corporation of America, a young company whose NBC radio programs were attracting huge audiences and whose RKO studios were producing and distributing popular motion pictures that offered welcome diversion in hard times. Rockefeller's financial power and RCA's media might were joined by the unusual talents of impresario S.L. "Roxy" Rothafel.. Together Rockefeller, RCA and Roxy realized a fantastic dream - a theatre unlike any in the world, and the first completed project within the complex that RCA head David Sarnoff dubbed "Radio City." Radio City Music Hall was to be a palace for the people. A place of beauty offering high-quality entertainment at prices ordinary people could afford. It was intended to entertain and amuse, but also to elevate and inspire.
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Back to the coach for a short rid to the building called ‘The Century’ located at 25 Century Park West.
the Century is a 1931 Art Deco apartment building ocated at Central Park West
and 63rd Street in Manhattan.  It was constructed at a cost of $6.5 million and designed by the firm of Irwin S. Chanin. Architecturally, it is cast in the Art Deco style, which causes it stand out from many of its neighbors, which are designed in the Beaux-Arts style. The structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places as a contibuting propery to the Central Park West Historic District, in 1982. The building, also part of a local historic district, is one of the three tallest structures within the boundaries of the district.

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 Our next stop is a bit further afield allowing one to view the city in comfort.  The Rego Park Jewish Center was built in 1948 by Frank Grad & Sons, the Rego Park Jewish Center and Synagogue is a great example of Streamline Moderne, a later type of Art Deco. The relatively plain facade features a brightly-colored kaleidoscopic mural by Hungarian-born artist A. Raymond Katz
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A small distance away lies the  first branch of the Ridgewood Savings Bank.
[size=100]D[/size]esignated a city landmark, highlights how the Art Deco style "appropriated different classical motifs and simplifies their decorative embellishments into clean, geometric forms," according to the Art Deco Society. The building takes, for example, the Neo-Classical column and flattens it into a simplified shape. The building was designed by Halsey, McCormack and Helmer and complete in 1940.
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The last of the building on our tour is the unique Fish Building.
The Fish Building, located at 1150 Grand Concourse, acquired its nickname decades ago as a result of the aquatic murals on its facade. The building was designed by Horace Ginsbern, who designed other pree-war gems in the Bronx in the Art Deco style and was constructed in 1937. Even more impressive than its facade, is its lobby. The lobby contains a red, green, and gold terrazzo floor, two murals by Rene and CP Graves, stained glass windows, and even beautifully ornamented walls and elevator doors.

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 This concludes our Art Deco Tour and we The Sisters of The Travelling Pan hope you have enjoyed some different facets of our great city and that you enjoy watching our Yankees win tonight.


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#38 [url]

Aug 25 16 9:13 AM

K9 Owned wrote:
After a very successful Guided Tour led by Twissis, The Sisters of The Travelling Pans had arranged their second day of touring New York City. 

Today will focus on the Art Deco architecture of this magnificent city. Art Deco architecture wasn't reserved for just high profile buildings; it proliferated throughout all five boroughs, making New York "the best city to explore the splendor" of the style. While we will see some of the easily recognizable structures we will also be introduced to some of the lesser known buildings of the period. 

Tour Type – Luxury Tour Bus retained from yesterdays trip
Tour Itinerary – Per attached brochure
Tour Date – August 29, 2016
Departure – 9 am from #1 Wall Street shown in the tour brochure below
Tour End – The Sisters will be taken by the coach from the last Art Deco stop at Ridgewood Savings bank to Yankee Stadium where they will see a baseball game at Yankee Stadium
Cost per person - $120 which includes tickets to the ball game.  A light lunch will be provided mid-day.
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Wow, there's so much that New York offers with regard to Art Deco!  And I'm all for that final stop at Yankee Stadium.  I'll get your completion noted on Page 1, K9.  I enjoyed reading it.

  Northwestgal

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#39 [url]

Aug 25 16 9:14 AM

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The newly-formed 
Twisted Sisters Tour Group proudly announces their Third Guided Tour. This tour follows on from the events, so capably arranged by our CEO, Twissis, and fellow traveller, K9 Owned. This tour focuses on public art displays in New York City, including some amazing neighbourhood street art in the famous community of Harlem.  

=24pxTour basics
Tour type - Luxury tour bus and on foot
Tour itinerary - See attached brochure
Tour date - Tuesday, 30 August 2016
Departure - The tour departs at 10 am from the Waldorf Astoria (setting for the Culinary Quest)

Return - The tour bus will return you to the same spot at 4pm
Cost - $60 per person with a 20% discount available to Culinary Quest #3 participants (lunch included)
Entertainment - The Twisted Sisters will perform a new Line-Dance Rockette-Style routine (again with choreography by Nancy's Pantry)

Preview -  imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

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=24pxTour brochure


Greater New York is exhbiting some new public art including 20 pieces that have been commissioned especially for this Northern Hemisphere summer. Our tour doesn't have enough time to visit all 20, so we'll be checking out the ones that have been the most popular so far this year. No need to worry about the addresses, because your tour bus will take you there. The day ends with a short walking tour of some of the best street art in Harlem. 

Stop #1 - Let's get off to a spooky start with Cornelia Parker's Transitional Object (Psycho Barn)
This red barn sits on the roof of The Metropolitan Art Museum. It draws its inspiration from the creepy Bates motel in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film Psycho, as well as the paintings of Edward Hopper.

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Stop #2 - Next is Isa Genzken’s Two Orchids. This piece towers over the southeast entrance to Central Park. Its immaculate white petals are perched on two thin stems made of stainless steel, standing 34 and 28 feet high. The last time this piece was publically displayed was in Venice. 

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Stop #3 - 
Everyone needs a bit of sparkle in the morning, so our next stop is at Martin Puryear’s Big Bling. It is the 33rd public art installation from Madison Square Park Conservancy’s art program. This abstract sculpture is 40 feet tall, with multiple tiers, and is constructed from birch wood varnished in 22-karat gold leaf. 

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Stop #4 - 
Then on to Deborah Kass’s new sculpture, OY/YO, on Brooklyn Bridge Park’s waterfront. This sassy sculpture means different things depending on which side you stand on. It can signify the popular Yiddish expression ‘Oy’ (as in Oy Vey!) or the popular urban slang phrase ‘Yo’ and the Spanish translation of ‘I am’.

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Stop #5 - 
No tour is complete without a visit to Coney Island. This annual exhibit features 21 murals by various artists. This year’s talent comes from big names, including Craze, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh and Mister Cartoon (pictured). The pieces are part of Greenwood Beach, an outdoor market with food from Calexico and Table 87, among others.

This will also be our lunch stop. Given that we are looking at outdoor art, we thought it fitting to have street food for lunch. 


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Stop #6 - 
After the hustle and bustle of Coney Island, we’re off to Governor’s Island Park. This summer, four man-made hills, designed by landscape architects, West 8, grace this tranquil park. Rachel Whiteread’s Cabin is nestled along the edge of Discovery Hill, overlooking New York Harbour and the Statue of Liberty. 

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Stop #7 - 
While on Governor’s Island, we’ll pop round to see the new sculpture garden (pictured) created as part of the Figment Participatory Art Festival that was in June. There’s also a ‘refurbished’ treehouse, a mini golf course and dream pavilions (but we won’t have time for all of those).

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Before being returned to the Waldorf by tour bus, the remainder of the afternoon will be a compact walking tour of some street art in Harlem. 

The Manhattan neighborhood of Harlem has a rich history as the birthplace of the Harlem Renaissance. This rennaisance brought forth a wealth of African-American literature, art and music that began in the late 1910s. Today, visitors to Harlem can see many community murals celebrating that history, if they know where to look. Luckily, we do.

Stop #8 - We'll start our Harlem visit at the Hope Steven Garden. In 1986, Eva Cockcroft painted a mural titled Homage to Seurat: La Grande Jatte in Harlem. Over the years, the mural faded and paint began to peel because of exposure to the elements. The mural’s decay made its ultimate demise seem inevitable. But, in 2009, after pressure from the community, the mural was fully restored. Here are the two sides of the mural.

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Stop #9 - As we walk, we'll see many notable, as well as many unsigned murals (artists unknown). 
There is also a series of portraits of people associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Here are musician Billy Strayhorn, playing the piano, with a couple dancing in the background, and Duke Ellington, the famous jazz musician, composer and band leader.

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Stop #10 - We
’ll wrap up our walking tour with two views of this mural celebrating Harlem’s musical history. Designed by artist Frank Parga, The Melody of Harlem, was painted by members of the local community.

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Your bus will now return you to the Waldorf Astoria. Hope you have enjoyed your day.

Last Edited By: Leggy Peggy Aug 25 16 9:29 AM. Edited 2 times.

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#40 [url]

Aug 25 16 6:37 PM

Pi-Rho Tours
75 minute Wall Street Guided Walking Tour
Friday, August 26, 2016
Meet at 10:00 a.m. at Trinity Church, 74 Trinity Pl., entrance at Broadway and the head of Wall St
$30 per adult, $15 per child ages 12 and under

Welcome to our Wall Street Tour, ladies and gentlemen. You are in the southern tip of Manhattan. It is the oldest part of New York. Here, the Dutch founded the settlement of Nieuw Amsterdam in the seventeenth century, purchasing the territory from local Indians, before surrendering it to the British in 1674. As New York expanded uptown and America became a world power, the city's most historic district became the seat of international finance, home to Wall Street, the New York Stock Exchange, and landmark skyscrapers.

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We start the tour at Trinity Church which was the tallest building in Manhattan until 1890, because of its 279-foot spire. What you see today is actually the third version of the church—the first, built in 1698, was destroyed by fire and the second was torn down in 1839 after significant storm damage. The current Gothic Revival edition was designed by architect Richard Upjohn and completed in 1846. Note the heavy bronze doors: these were designed by Richard Morris Hunt, who is famous for designing the Statue of Liberty's pedestal. We’ll also check out the adjacent Trinity Churchyard, where many luminaries are buried, including the first secretary of the treasury Alexander Hamilton, inventor of the steamboat Robert Fulton, and famous financier John Jacob Astor.

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The first building on the right as we enter Wall Street from Broadway is one of the best-designed buildings of Ralph Walker. In the Art Deco style, the building was constructed between 1929-32 for the Irving Trust Co. Through the tall windows we have a view of the flaming mosaic walls designed by Mildrett Meière. The Bank of New York, founded by Alexander Hamilton in 1789, was the first stock traded on the New York Stock Exchange in 1792.

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#14 Bankers Trust is on the left side of the street. Built in 1912 by Trowbridge & Livingston, the stepped pyramid at the top is so iconic that Bankers Trust adopted it as the company logo. One thing you might notice is that this particular building appears to rise completely vertically, rather than inward steps. This is because this building was built before New York City instituted its set-back laws, which was a response to complaints that buildings like the Bankers Trust Building created a darkened Wall Street below. You can see the difference between this building and 40 Wall Street, which was built under the new rules.

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At 11 Wall Street is the largest stock exchange in the world, the New York Stock Exchange. It had its humble beginnings in 1792 when twenty-four ambitious brokers established trading ground rules beneath a buttonwood tree further down Wall Street. Now the trading takes place inside the stock exchange's neo-classical masterpiece, built in 1903 and designed by George B. Post. The Broad Street façade is celebrated for its grandiose pediment, a marble sculpture by John Quincy Adams Ward titled "Integrity Protecting the Works of Man," which looms above six enormous Corinthian capitals. Due to security concerns, tours are no longer allowed. But the action on the trading floor never stops, with shares of some $169 billion changing hands daily.

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The Federal Hall National Memorial at 26 Wall Street was built in 1842 in the Classic style, with Greek and Roman details. The building is said to reflect the democratic ideals of ancient Greece and the power of the Roman Empire. It’s on the site of the original Federal Hall. The first building, built in 1700 and torn down in 1812, served as America's first capitol and was the stage of several major scenes in American history. John Quincy Adams Ward's famous bronze statue of Washington from 1882 stands exactly where the first president would have taken his oath on April 30, 1789. The Bill of Rights was adopted here in September of that year. Step around to the north of the building, where you'll find a bas relief sculpture of George Washington praying at Valley Forge. The hall now contains a mall museum commemorating the building's history. Let’s step inside to see the former vault in the basement and visit the changing exhibits that are on display. We’ll spend a few minutes in the visitor center here so you can look around. This is a great place to use the bathroom facilities if anyone would like to.

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Morgan Guaranty Trust at 23 Wall Street was the bank of J.P. Morgan, who said he did not have to build a skyscraper as a monument to his wealth since everyone knew how much he was worth. He died a year before the building was completed in 1914. The headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co. was so well known as the "House of Morgan" or "the Corner" that the actual name of the investment bank was never marked on its façade.

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Let’s take a closer look on the Wall Street side of the building where gouges can still be seen under the last two windows from a bomb blast in 1920. A cart of TNT was exploded, killing 33 people and sending more than 300 to the hospital with injuries. No one was arrested, although anarchists were suspected.

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The façade of #40 Wall Street now boasts the name Trump, it’s current owner, and is used for commercial offices. The building was once the tallest building in the world. Constructed by H. Craig Severance and Yasuo Matsui for the Bank of Manhattan in 1929, it was designed to be the tallest building in the world. But William Van Alen was building the Chrysler Building on 42nd Street, and he surpassed the height of 40 Wall Street by raising a spire on the top of the Chrysler Building three days after 40 Wall Street opened. Both buildings were surpassed when the Empire State Building was completed the following year.

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The Museum of American Finance is now located in the grand hall of the former Bank of New York Building. The Museum, a non-profit Smithsonian affiliate, is the only independent museum dedicated to providing educational programs on “finance, the financial markets, money, banking and Alexander Hamilton,” according to their website.

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#55 Wall Street was built after the fire of 1835 destroyed the original Merchants’ Exchange. The three-story Ionic temple-style building boasts 16 single block granite columns of Quincy granite and a commanding central hall that is now an events facility. The upper floors were added by McKim, Mead & White in 1907 after the custom house relocated from this building to Bowling Green. Today, the upper floors are 106 exquisite apartments.

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#60 Wall Street, a 50-story skyscraper, is the tallest building on Wall Street. Built in 1985 for JP Morgan and Company, it was purchased by Deutsche Bank in 2001. Once the attacks of 911 damaged the company’s building on Liberty Street, the 5500 employees were relocated here. The design is a modern interpretation of a Greek temple. On the roof at 737 feet is a solar installation, which is the highest solar PV installation in the world.

This concludes our guided tour of Wall Street. If you enjoyed this tour, we recommend that you also visit the Wall Street Bull and the Alexander Hamilton U. S. Custom House on Bowling Green. You also might enjoy Fraunces Tavern Museum on Pearl Street where George Washington held a victory banquet and bid farewell to his officers in 1783, after the British had been defeated. We also recommend a walk in the Stone Street Historic District and a visit to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Liberty Street where the world’s largest gold reserves are held. It was a pleasure to guide you on Wall Street today. Please continue to enjoy your visit in New York City.

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Last Edited By: PanNan Aug 25 16 7:52 PM. Edited 5 times.

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