#641 [url]

Aug 26 16 7:23 AM

Diner524 wrote:
I think I have completed all the open slot areas for challenges(that I can) except for the kid's challenge and for me, my kids are both in their 20's (24 and soon to be 29) and I have no grandkids, or neices or nephews here in FL, and all my neighbors have older kids, so I truly can't help with this challenge unless I can use my 9 yo dogs?  I have really always hated the kids challenge, not because of the kids, but because for the last 5-10 years I haven't had access to kids that age for the challenges, so I claim age discrimination for the challenges, lol!!

I agree... I think Kids Challenges should be included in the official list of micro-aggressions. It simply throws in my face the facts that I'm no longer in my 30's (with young children) and that my adult children are too selfish to procreate...   LOL. I think I'm kidding, of course.


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#642 [url]

Aug 26 16 8:17 AM

=24pxBig Apple Adventures Challenge 

Alexander Hamilton Walking Tour with Charter to Hamilton Grange and Optional Broadway Show 

Beginning Point: Battery Park

Points of Interest:  
Kings College (Columbia University), Fraunces Tavern, Bowling Green, Federal Hall, Morris-Jumel Mansion, Trinity Church, Hamilton Grange, Hamilton the Musical

Departs: 10:00 am 
Returns: 12:00 pm

Cost of Walking Tour: $25 per person

Optional Charter to Hamilton Grange:  $25 per person departing at 1:30 pm

Broadway Show - Hamilton the Musical:  $125 for 6:00 pm showing


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Alexander Hamilton was born illegitimate on a remote Caribbean island where he was orphaned at an early age.  At 19 years of age he came to New York to further his education at Kings College.  In Hamilton's time New York City only occupied the southern end of Manhattan. To the north were country estates with farmland in between.  Most of the placed Hamilton frequented are well within walking distance of each other.         


Starting Point - Battery Park


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From Battery Park can be seen the Statue of Liberty.  As a Founding Father, this magnificent statue represents what our original Patriots fought for. 


Next Stop - Kings College (Columbia University)


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Although his journey from the West Indies was sponsored so he could further his education in America, the young Hamilton, barely in his twenties, dropped out of King’s College in 1775 to fight in the Revolutionary War. (The college changed its name to Columbia University after the British defeat.) When Hamilton attended the institution, it was located in College Hall, which was built on a plot of land northwest of the city’s Common (today’s City Hall Park), bound by the present-day Murray, Church, Barclay, and Greenwich Streets. (It was demolished in 1857.) In 1908, Hamilton’s alma mater honored him with the bronze statue that now commands the entrance of Hamilton Hall located on the east side of the university’s current location on Manhattan’s Upper West Side at 116th Street and Amsterdam Avenue.


Next Stop - Fraunces Tavern


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Located at 54 Pearl Street at the corner of Broad Street, Fraunces Tavern originally bore the name of Queen Charlotte (the young bride of King George III); the public house eventually took on the name of its proprietor and figured prominently in the war against the British. Fraunces Tavern’s Long Room was the scene of Washington’s emotional farewell to the Continental Army on December 4, 1783, just more than a week after the last British soldiers left New York. In 1785 the tavern was leased to the Continental Congress for three years and housed several government departments, including Hamilton’s Treasury Department. On July 4, 1804, both Hamilton and Aaron Burr attended a banquet hosted by the Society of the Cincinnati, an order of retired officers from the Revolutionary War, just a week before their infamous duel. Today only a few structural walls of the original building remain; the tavern was rebuilt in the Colonial Revival style by the Sons of Liberty, who purchased the property in 1904. It now includes two restaurants in addition to several rooms of museum space. The famous Long Room is re-created with colonial artifacts to conjure up its Revolutionary past. 



Next Stop - Bowling Green
imageThe moment when General Washington read out the newly minted Declaration of Independence to his troops in New York in July 1776, a mob of soldiers and nationalists rushed to Bowling Green, a city park since 1733, and tore down the gilded statue of the tone-deaf British monarch from its marble pedestal. The statue was decapitated and the king’s head stuck on a spike; the lead from the sculpture was melted down to make ammunition for the Revolutionary War. The park’s original metal fence was removed in 1914 when a subway station was built near the site, but was later discovered intact in storage and re-erected on the original site. When you visit Bowling Green park today, at the foot of Broadway, Whitehall Street, and State Street, you can still see where the 18th century patriots sawed the decorative crowns off the tops of the fence posts in their defiance of the British. The destruction of George III’s statue and its historical import inspired German artist Johannes Adam Simon Oertel to paint the scene, albeit with considerable poetic license. The original is part of the collection of the New-York Historical Society and is currently on display at the Society’s galleries at 170 Central Park West, along with a surviving fragment from the tail of the equestrian statue. 


Next Stop - Federal Hall



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Washington was inaugurated as the country’s first president amid great fanfare at Federal Hall, located at 28 Wall Street. The building itself was torn down and replaced by the U.S. Customs House in 1842. The current Greek Revival–style building now functions as the Federal Hall National Memorial. You can see two artifacts preserved from Hamilton’s era: the Bible upon which the country’s first president took his oath of office, and a stone tile from the balcony where Washington stood for the ceremony on April 30, 1789.


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A five-minute detour from Federal Hall will take you to 59 Maiden Lane, a sprawling office tower whose claim to fame is the plaque on one side of the building, which marks the house, at number 57, where Thomas Jefferson lived while he served as the first secretary of state. Jefferson loathed his time here; he described New York City as “a cloacina of all the depravities of human nature.” It was in this house that he, James Madison, and Hamilton worked out the compromise of 1790 whereby the federal government assumed all state debts in return for establishing a permanent capital along the shores of the Potomac. The deal had far-reaching consequences, but, as Burr enviously notes in the musical, “No one else was in the room where it happened.” 


Next Stop - Morris-Jumel Mansion



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In July 1790, Washington hosted a dinner for his Cabinet members and their families, who included Hamilton, Jefferson, Henry Knox, and John Adams, at Manhattan’s oldest surviving historic home. It is now known as the Morris-Jumel Mansion and is located at 65 Jumel Terrace, near 160th Street and Edgecombe Avenue. The celebratory dinner commemorated one of the first victories of the Revolutionary War — the Battle of Harlem Heights, in 1776 — during which Washington, with Hamilton as his aide, headquartered in the house. Being sited on the second highest hill on the island of Manhattan, it commanded an unobstructed view of New York Harbor. By a strange coincidence of history, the man who was responsible for Hamilton’s death, Aaron Burr, also lived at the Morris-Jumel house when he was briefly married, at age 77, to the widow Eliza Jumel who was believed at the time to be the wealthiest woman in the nation. Lin-Manuel Miranda was given the opportunity to actually work in Burr’s own bedroom while he was working on his musical.  When she decided to divorce Burr, she hired Hamilton's son to represent her.  Aaron Burr passed away on the day the divorce was finalized. The view across the Hudson River from Weehawken, New Jersey, is spectacular, but on that fateful dawn on July 11, 1804, Alexander Hamilton wasn’t there for the view. His appointment was with Aaron Burr. Vice President Burr had challenged his archrival to a duel for allegedly imputing his honor. Was it murder, suicide, or just plain bad luck? Why did Hamilton throw away his shot by shooting in the air? Historians will probably never agree. But Hamilton, age 49, was mortally wounded and died a day later.
 

End - Trinity Church



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Hamilton’s funeral on July 14, 1804, is reported to have been a very solemn occasion. He was buried on the south side of Trinity Church, bordering Rector Street. The church itself, at 79 Broadway at Wall Street, is the third building to be constructed on this site, consecrated in 1846. Eliza Schuyler Hamilton outlived her husband by 50 years. She tirelessly worked to preserve her late husband’s legacy, particularly during the years when he was being vilified by the likes of John Adams, who called Hamilton an “indefatigable and unprincipled intriguer.” When she died in 1854, she was buried next to her husband in Trinity Churchyard.
 

Optional Charter to Hamilton Grange



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Unlike his fellow founding fathers, Hamilton didn’t come from landed gentry. His “sweet project,” as he called it, was The Grange, a two-story frame Federal-style house that he built on 35 acres of farmland 9 miles north of his law offices in Lower Manhattan. But he got to live in it for just two years until his untimely death in 1804. Eliza Hamilton continued to live at The Grange until it was sold in 1833 and she moved to Washington, D.C. Originally sited on an elevation that provided views of the Hudson River on the west and the Harlem and East Rivers on the east, The Grange was relocated in 1889 to make way for the extension of the Manhattan grid. The original structure was moved 250 feet by horse-drawn carriage to Convent Avenue near 141st Street; it remained there until 2008, when it was moved to its present location at the north end of St. Nicholas Park — this time with the benefit of computerized hydraulics. A careful five-year restoration that replaced lost design features and décor was completed in 2011. Most of the furniture on display, with the notable exception of the piano, are faithful reproductions. When you walk through the study, dining room, and parlor of The Grange today, you can get a sense of how Hamilton might have spent the last two years of his life. The green-walled study (a particularly expensive and unusual shade of paint in its day) contains a few books from his original library — volumes on history and economics that, though rebound in later years, carry the signatures of Hamilton and his wife on the flyleaves — as well as a replica of his portable desk (a lap-desk, if you will). In the yellow-walled octagonal dining room, graced with mirrored doors and majestic French windows, the silver centerpiece on the dining table is an original family heirloom. And of particular interest is the wine cooler — a replica of the gift sent to Hamilton in 1797 from the retired George Washington as a gesture of friendship.


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Alexander Hamilton's Wine Cooler

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Lucy's Wine Cooler(s)

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#643 [url]

Aug 26 16 8:23 AM

JostLori wrote:

Diner524 wrote:
I think I have completed all the open slot areas for challenges(that I can) except for the kid's challenge and for me, my kids are both in their 20's (24 and soon to be 29) and I have no grandkids, or neices or nephews here in FL, and all my neighbors have older kids, so I truly can't help with this challenge unless I can use my 9 yo dogs?  I have really always hated the kids challenge, not because of the kids, but because for the last 5-10 years I haven't had access to kids that age for the challenges, so I claim age discrimination for the challenges, lol!!

I agree... I think Kids Challenges should be included in the official list of micro-aggressions. It simply throws in my face the facts that I'm no longer in my 30's (with young children) and that my adult children are too selfish to procreate...   LOL. I think I'm kidding, of course.

You guys are too funny, yet I am in the same boat!

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#644 [url]

Aug 26 16 9:01 AM

threeovens wrote:

JostLori wrote:

Diner524 wrote:
I think I have completed all the open slot areas for challenges(that I can) except for the kid's challenge and for me, my kids are both in their 20's (24 and soon to be 29) and I have no grandkids, or neices or nephews here in FL, and all my neighbors have older kids, so I truly can't help with this challenge unless I can use my 9 yo dogs?  I have really always hated the kids challenge, not because of the kids, but because for the last 5-10 years I haven't had access to kids that age for the challenges, so I claim age discrimination for the challenges, lol!!

I agree... I think Kids Challenges should be included in the official list of micro-aggressions. It simply throws in my face the facts that I'm no longer in my 30's (with young children) and that my adult children are too selfish to procreate...   LOL. I think I'm kidding, of course.

You guys are too funny, yet I am in the same boat!

I see a support group forming...


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#645 [url]

Aug 26 16 9:13 AM

I chose the Waldorf salad and made:

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Classic Waldorf Salad

Even though Oscar Tschirky was never an actual chef, although he is credited with creating many famous dishes, his farm in upstate New Paltz later was operated as a home for retired chefs.

Oscar played himself in one of those news shorts in 1933, titled, "Repeal Brings Wet Flood!"  I don't know exactly what that means, but the newsreel can be seen on the Warner DVD of "The Little Giant" (1933).

During his lifetime, Oscar collected restaurant menus.  Cornell University is in possession of his collection and they have been adding to it.  Their collection now numbers more than 10,000.

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#648 [url]

Aug 26 16 9:37 AM

For New York!

Hi, 

fyi:  the recipes below were posted on the New York string:

Below I've posted recipes in honor of New York.  I LOVE New York!  Sorry no pics.  I'm at a vacation cottage on our summer vaca and the lighting is poorer than poor, time is rushed and the internet slow where it's driving me crazy.....  Gotta tell you just-a-pinch is the slowest and so clunky....my goodness.  

leggypeggy's:  https://cookingonpage32.wordpress.com/2012/03/29/steaks-au-poivre-steaks-with-crushed-peppercorns/
Northwest gal:  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/chicken/cornell-university-barbecued-chicken.html?p=3
diner524:  http://www.food.com/recipe/blueberry-cheesecake-flapjacks-415115
Susie D's :  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/green-salad/smoky-thousand-island-dressing.html?p=4
Annacia:  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/sandwiches/how-to-make-katzs-famous-pastrami-reuben.html#page1:comment2170218
JostLori:  http://www.recipezazz.com/recipe/new-york-style-crumb-cake-atk-11453

I've also posted Annacia's:  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/sandwiches/how-to-make-katzs-famous-pastrami-reuben.html#page1:comment2170218 on the "Your Deli or Mine" challenge.  

And one last recipe for CQ3 that my daughter and I made:  LifeIsGood's:  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/dessert/other-dessert/easy-individual-cheesecakes-with-strawberry-sauce.html  

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#649 [url]

Aug 26 16 8:11 PM

I have posted my Best of the Quest choices in the Best of the Quest thread.

I want to thank all of you for being fabulous team members! I really appreciate all of the cooking that you did, as well as tackling some of those time consuming challenges. You are all so AWESOME!! A special 'thank you' to Lucy for taking on the daunting task of Captain. I've been there several times so I know how much time it takes. Thanks again, you guys are great!!


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#650 [url]

Aug 27 16 12:15 AM

If you have any thoughts on team 15 etc. tell me now or forever hold your peace. I'm going to the Giants/Jets preseason game tomorrow and we have to leave something like 1 pm for the tailgating, so I have to finish page 1 tonight since I am working tomorrow...

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#651 [url]

Aug 27 16 2:20 AM

threeovens wrote:
If you have any thoughts on team 15 etc. tell me now or forever hold your peace. I'm going to the Giants/Jets preseason game tomorrow and we have to leave something like 1 pm for the tailgating, so I have to finish page 1 tonight since I am working tomorrow...

You've been doing a great job choosing them so far!  I trust your choices.  Do let me know if you need my help with anything since you'll be busy.  Have a blast at the game/tailgate!
 

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#652 [url]

Aug 27 16 4:17 AM

threeovens wrote:
If you have any thoughts on team 15 etc. tell me now or forever hold your peace. I'm going to the Giants/Jets preseason game tomorrow and we have to leave something like 1 pm for the tailgating, so I have to finish page 1 tonight since I am working tomorrow...

You have done a great job picking the recipes, I wouldn't want to jinx it!!  Do you have to turn in the "Bingo" sheet for the Olymics by tonight too?  

Have a great time at the game and tailgating, so fun!!


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#654 [url]

Aug 27 16 5:11 AM

There is one thing.  I've been struggling with the olympic thing.  I can't figure out where to find final positions.  For Tiago Apolonia, I only know he was out before the quarterfinals.  Vassiliki Vougiouka round of 16.  Kirstie Alora lost in the 3rd round.  Andreas Seppi lost in the 2nd round.  Do you think that will be good enough.?

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#655 [url]

Aug 27 16 5:18 AM

threeovens wrote:
There is one thing.  I've been struggling with the olympic thing.  I can't figure out where to find final positions.  For Tiago Apolonia, I only know he was out before the quarterfinals.  Vassiliki Vougiouka round of 16.  Kirstie Alora lost in the 3rd round.  Andreas Seppi lost in the 2nd round.  Do you think that will be good enough.?

Hi Lucy, image

Vickie responded to your question about this in the Olympic thread.  Here's what she said........

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For some, I got the athlete's final position from the ESPN website.  For others, I just googled it.  Like:  "final ranking for (athlete) in (sport) in rio".  That worked for me anyway.  That's how I got most of our final rankings.  

Some categories you won't need to look up because you'll know.  Like, did the sport use transportation (bike, horse, etc) or did the sport use a weapon (gun, sword, etc) or was it an ocean sport.  But for the two bonus boxes related to age (under 20, and over 40), you'll need to know your athletes.  I didn't know about 95% of our athletes' ages, so I used Wikipedia for that.


ETA - there are some sports that don't rank all competitors, only those who are in the top 20, top 18, etc.  For those situations, if our athlete competed but didn't get ranked because they didn't get beyond semi-finals, I just listed the general ranking (like in the top 16) or I put "didn't rank, out in 1st round".

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Vickie was the one to do this for the host team so I have to admit that I don't know much more than what she said. If you need more clarification, let me know and I'll go ask.

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#656 [url]

Aug 27 16 5:21 AM

threeovens wrote:
If you have any thoughts on team 15 etc. tell me now or forever hold your peace. I'm going to the Giants/Jets preseason game tomorrow and we have to leave something like 1 pm for the tailgating, so I have to finish page 1 tonight since I am working tomorrow...

I, too, think you've been doing a great job of choosing!  For NY, I just think the most common would be liver (chopped or otherwise), hot dogs, lox & bagel, egg cream, pastrami in any form - as total classics.

For Greece - anything with avgolemono, phyllo, feta.


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#657 [url]

Aug 27 16 5:28 AM

threeovens wrote:
There is one thing.  I've been struggling with the olympic thing.  I can't figure out where to find final positions.  For Tiago Apolonia, I only know he was out before the quarterfinals.  Vassiliki Vougiouka round of 16.  Kirstie Alora lost in the 3rd round.  Andreas Seppi lost in the 2nd round.  Do you think that will be good enough.?

Well I am the worst person to answer this, as I couldn't even find the information to begin with for picking a sport and an athlete, lol!!  I would try asking them in captains thread.  When I tried to research the info on the Portugal table tennis player, I saw his rank was now 17, up from 18,  but then saw that he lost 2 games, but I also saw somewhere (before today) that he won his first game and then lost the second, so I have not a clue.

Page one isn't updated right?  If so, I have a bunch of missing info.


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#659 [url]

Aug 27 16 7:19 AM

Posted to the Best of thread:

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Aaargh! This is the toughest part of the game!  I have ten links open, too hard to choose... but here goes.

The best of the best was Northwest Gal's  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/seafood/shrimp-sardi.html?p=1 .  Thanks, Vickie!!!
Next, it would be Diner 524's  http://www.food.com/recipe/grecian-skillet-rib-eyes-427985 .  Wow!  Thanks, Lynn!!!

Base Sauce for Shrimp Sardi
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Shrimp Sardi
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Grecian Skillet Ribeyes
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HONORABLE MENTIONS - can't avoid those! But I promise not to post all eight...

Mikekey's addictive seasoning:  http://www.food.com/recipe/gomasio-japanese-sesame-seed-condiment-135282
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Mikekey's  http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/salad/other-salad/bacalhau-chickpea-salad.html
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JackieOhNo!'s  http://www.food.com/recipe/frozen-souffle-amaretto-windows-on-the-world-527825
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