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Jan 1 15 3:00 PM

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Most people really enjoy having a Chinese meal.

Chinese cooking is renowned throughout the world and Chinese food has a distinctive culinary style all its own. The emphasis is on fresh, seasonal ingredients, prepared with a minimum of fuss and beautifully balanced as far as color, texture and presentation. There are several cooking techniques. All seek to preserve flavor and nutrients. 

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This is the classic Chinese cooking method but there are many other ways like Braising, steaming, Roasting, Stir frying or boiling.

One important thing is to make sure that you have all your ingredients prepared well ahead, specially ifyou are stir frying as you just dont have time to do anything once you start cooking!
The best Wok to buy is a mild steel wok. found in any Asian Store - they need oiling each time they are washed but they are the best at conducting heat.

Last Edited By: Joyfulcook Jan 1 15 3:08 PM. Edited 1 time

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#1 [url]

Jan 1 15 9:50 PM

I have an old steel wok; it looks terrible; but, I use it on my side burners on my stove. It is great to make stir fry ANYTHING in. It also works on my stove too. I also suggest over a non stick electric wok too. I got mine from Goodwill many many years.

As mentioned, have everything ready. It is very quick cooking.
Also, these days; most ingredients are available at many main stream grocery stores. Of course if you have an Asian market close by; you can really get some unique ingredients.
Fish sauce, different oils, chili and pepper sauces, soy, tamar, ginger, etc; are all things I keep on hand. One, they last forever in the fridge; also, you will find that you will use them more and more.
Once you use them, there are many dishes you can make using these ingredients. From egg rolls, stir fries, fried rice; soups and salads too.

Kim ~ Eat, Live, and Love! 

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#2 [url]

Jan 2 15 12:26 AM

I took 9 months of Chinese cooking lessons many years ago - out teacher took us to a local Chinese market and helped us uderstand the ingredients better. I still use the cleaver and wok I bought from the instructor.

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#3 [url]

Jan 2 15 1:41 AM

kchurchill5 wrote:
I have an old steel wok; it looks terrible; but, I use it on my side burners on my stove. It is great to make stir fry ANYTHING in. It also works on my stove too. I also suggest over a non stick electric wok too. I got mine from Goodwill many many years.

As mentioned, have everything ready. It is very quick cooking.
Also, these days; most ingredients are available at many main stream grocery stores. Of course if you have an Asian market close by; you can really get some unique ingredients.
Fish sauce, different oils, chili and pepper sauces, soy, tamar, ginger, etc; are all things I keep on hand. One, they last forever in the fridge; also, you will find that you will use them more and more.
Once you use them, there are many dishes you can make using these ingredients. From egg rolls, stir fries, fried rice; soups and salads too.

nothing beats the old steel wok! might look a bit iffy but they are the best.  I use so much ginger and garlic in my stir frys along with so many of the sauces.... one thing there are no vampires anywhere near this house image


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#4 [url]

Jan 2 15 1:43 AM

duonyte wrote:
I took 9 months of Chinese cooking lessons many years ago - out teacher took us to a local Chinese market and helped us uderstand the ingredients better. I still use the cleaver and wok I bought from the instructor.

Well then duonyte you should be able to give us lots of ideas, recipes and hints... please :) I do love the local Asian markets, besides getting the things I need its always so interesting too.  I think a clever would be a bit dangerous in my hands now!

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#5 [url]

Jan 2 15 4:52 AM

duonyte wrote:
I took 9 months of Chinese cooking lessons many years ago - out teacher took us to a local Chinese market and helped us uderstand the ingredients better. I still use the cleaver and wok I bought from the instructor.

Cool image

x_3f857df8 photo x_3f857df8_zps88a318c3.gif

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#6 [url]

Jan 2 15 7:16 AM

Joyful, my wok looks like it went through war; but, it is sturdy and a great pan. I will never give it up. My pizza stone looks about the same as well. So, I guess that is a good thing.

Kim ~ Eat, Live, and Love! 

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#7 [url]

Jan 2 15 7:18 AM

I admit, I usually go out for Chinese. It is usually just me; and, I like to get 3-4 items; and take it home for next day. It isn't worth making.

Other, than a 1 pan stir fry. But, it is just easier for me. NOW, if making for 3-4 friends. I will make it.

Kim ~ Eat, Live, and Love! 

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#8 [url]

Jan 2 15 11:32 AM

Hello Joyful Cook and others,

I love to cook Chinese Food and have done so for mucho years, like over 50 years! Living In Metro NYC it is a great advantage to have a very big Chinatown in Manhattan and now over the years there are other
developed areas for Chinese/Asian ingredient shopping in Queens and Brooklyn (two of New York Cities Boroughs). Besides getting Chinese ingredients, you can also get other Asian cuisine food ingredients as well; Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Indian, etc. However, if you do not live near a big city, some basic ingredients can be found in supermarkets (soy sauce, sesame oil, green vegetables, ginger, garlic, Curry Powder etc) or if need be ordered on line. Plus the other big advantage is that in the spring time to fall, many Asian greens are grown locally like in New Jersey (or shipped from Florida).

If you care to, you can go to "Food dot com" and see all my photos and recipes.... especially the Asian recipes.

Regarding woks, I have used many types and the big Cast Iron ones are the most common... which need to be "seasoned" before use. However, I now mainly use a very big Teflon coated wok and it also comes with a glass cover... great for cooking MaPoDoFo or Spinach or a Tofu and Fish soup etc. Aside #1- when I steam a fish, I often use my micro wave and with plastic wrap over the dish with the fish... takes 4-5 minutes... instead of a wok with the trivet tray and cover for steaming. Aside #2- Second to a good wok, I used a Zojirushi rice cooker for making rice (and great for Congee/Juck).

Happy Cooking Chinese and other Asian Foods,

Skipper/Sy
Metro NYC

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#9 [url]

Jan 3 15 7:31 AM

kchurchill5 wrote:
I admit, I usually go out for Chinese. It is usually just me; and, I like to get 3-4 items; and take it home for next day. It isn't worth making.

Other, than a 1 pan stir fry. But, it is just easier for me. NOW, if making for 3-4 friends. I will make it.

When I first moved out here - western suburbs of CHicago - there was no decent Chinese food. I tried every restaurant within reasonable distance from my apt, then my house. All the food I would order would taste the same - don't know if they were just bad cooks or thought that a non-Chinese person would not know the difference So I took the lessons as the only reasonable alternative, and at least initially, I cooked Chinese 4 or 5 nights a week. Now I have a decent Chinese restaurant close to my home that I do buy at -- I do something similar, buy several dishes including two quarts of hot and sour soup and am happy for a couple of days. Finally found a few Vietnamese restaurants, but none of them are what I would call close. We used to have a terrific one, but it closed years ago. Still looking for a good Indian take-away - we have restaurants that are pretty good, but I just want to be able to buy a couple of take-out dishes. We do have a few good Arabic/Middle Eastern places. 

I made Chinese just last night - improvised something with pork, a slightly sweet sauce and some frozen veggies, yummy.

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#11 [url]

Jan 3 15 11:40 PM

SkipperSy wrote:
Hello Joyful Cook and others,

I love to cook Chinese Food and have done so for mucho years, like over 50 years! Living In Metro NYC it is a great advantage to have a very big Chinatown in Manhattan and now over the years there are other
developed areas for Chinese/Asian ingredient shopping in Queens and Brooklyn (two of New York Cities Boroughs). Besides getting Chinese ingredients, you can also get other Asian cuisine food ingredients as well; Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Indian, etc. However, if you do not live near a big city, some basic ingredients can be found in supermarkets (soy sauce, sesame oil, green vegetables, ginger, garlic, Curry Powder etc) or if need be ordered on line. Plus the other big advantage is that in the spring time to fall, many Asian greens are grown locally like in New Jersey (or shipped from Florida).

If you care to, you can go to "Food dot com" and see all my photos and recipes.... especially the Asian recipes.

Regarding woks, I have used many types and the big Cast Iron ones are the most common... which need to be "seasoned" before use. However, I now mainly use a very big Teflon coated wok and it also comes with a glass cover... great for cooking MaPoDoFo or Spinach or a Tofu and Fish soup etc. Aside #1- when I steam a fish, I often use my micro wave and with plastic wrap over the dish with the fish... takes 4-5 minutes... instead of a wok with the trivet tray and cover for steaming. Aside #2- Second to a good wok, I used a Zojirushi rice cooker for making rice (and great for Congee/Juck).

Happy Cooking Chinese and other Asian Foods,

Skipper/Sy
Metro NYC

Welcome SkipperSy - great to see you here! I must go check out your food.com recipes. is your name the same there? mine is also joyfulcook there as well.  I love Asian cooking and browsing through the supermarkets and stores is great.  ow about sharing some recipes here with us too. thanks for those tips - very useful!!


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#12 [url]

Jan 3 15 11:41 PM

kchurchill5 wrote:
Joyful, my wok looks like it went through war; but, it is sturdy and a great pan. I will never give it up. My pizza stone looks about the same as well. So, I guess that is a good thing.

it sure is Kim and there is nothing better than old well used woks and stones!

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#13 [url]

Jan 3 15 11:49 PM

duonyte wrote:

kchurchill5 wrote:
I admit, I usually go out for Chinese. It is usually just me; and, I like to get 3-4 items; and take it home for next day. It isn't worth making.

Other, than a 1 pan stir fry. But, it is just easier for me. NOW, if making for 3-4 friends. I will make it.

When I first moved out here - western suburbs of CHicago - there was no decent Chinese food. I tried every restaurant within reasonable distance from my apt, then my house. All the food I would order would taste the same - don't know if they were just bad cooks or thought that a non-Chinese person would not know the difference So I took the lessons as the only reasonable alternative, and at least initially, I cooked Chinese 4 or 5 nights a week. Now I have a decent Chinese restaurant close to my home that I do buy at -- I do something similar, buy several dishes including two quarts of hot and sour soup and am happy for a couple of days. Finally found a few Vietnamese restaurants, but none of them are what I would call close. We used to have a terrific one, but it closed years ago. Still looking for a good Indian take-away - we have restaurants that are pretty good, but I just want to be able to buy a couple of take-out dishes. We do have a few good Arabic/Middle Eastern places. 

I made Chinese just last night - improvised something with pork, a slightly sweet sauce and some frozen veggies, yummy.

Isnt it amazing how over the years restaurants etc come and go but the trends change so much.  duonyte - thing about chinese is improvising is yhe way to go! sounds nice.

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#14 [url]

Jan 4 15 11:10 PM

Chef Name on Food dot com- Skipper/ Sy

Hello Joyfulcook,

>>Welcome SkipperSy - great to see you here! I must go check out your food.com recipes. is your name the same there? mine is also joyfulcook there as well.  I love Asian cooking and browsing through the supermarkets and stores is great.  ow about sharing some recipes here with us too. thanks for those tips - very useful!!<<

My chef name on food dot com is Skipper/Sy however, they have changed it to Skipper/ Sy.... so in the recipe search box, type in "Sy" and all or most of my recipes will show up. Thanks in advance for looking!

Skipper/Sy
Metro NYC

 

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