#1001 [url]

Aug 28 15 6:58 AM

Bayhill wrote:

I'll sign up for Munching Minions. I'll be doing:

George Strait (country)
Taylor Swift (pop)The Fabulous Thunderbirds (blues)



Bayhill,
I can't find anything on Taylor Swift living in Texas.  Did you? If not she'll need to be replaced.

Thanks! 

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#1003 [url]

Aug 28 15 4:24 PM

Welcome to Texas! 

Are you ready to discover more about Texas? 

The Dr Pepper Company is the oldest major manufacturer of soft drink concentrates and syrups in the United States.In 1885, in Waco, Texas, a young pharmacist called Charles Alderton invented the soft drink "Dr Pepper".
imageAlderton worked at a place called Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store and carbonated drinks were served at the soda fountain. Alderton invented his own recipes for soft drinks and found one of his drinks was becoming very popular. His customers originally asked for the drink by asking Alderton to shoot them a "Waco". =smallMorrison, owner of the drug store is credited with naming the drink "Dr Pepper" after a friend of his, Dr. Charles Pepper. Later in the 1950s the period was removed from the "Dr Pepper" name.
=small    As demand grew Alderton and Morrison had trouble manufacturing enough "Dr Pepper" for their customers. Then in stepped, Robert S. Lazenby, Lazenby owned The Circle "A" Ginger Ale Company in Waco and was impressed with "Dr Pepper". Alderton did not want to pursue the business and manufacturing end of soft drinks and agreed that Morrison and Lazenby should take over and become partners.In 1891, Morrison and Lazenby formed the Artesian Mfg. & Bottling Company, which later became the Dr Pepper Company.=smallIn 1904, the company introduced Dr Pepper to 20 million people attending the 1904, World's Fair Exposition, in St. Louis. That same world's fair introduced hamburger and hot dog buns and ice cream cones to the public. (note: Texas lays claim to the invention of the hamburger too. ) 

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#1004 [url]

Aug 28 15 5:58 PM

Susie D wrote:

Bayhill wrote:

I'll sign up for Munching Minions. I'll be doing:

George Strait (country)
Taylor Swift (pop)The Fabulous Thunderbirds (blues)



Bayhill,
I can't find anything on Taylor Swift living in Texas.  Did you? If not she'll need to be replaced.

Thanks! 

I had thought she lived in Texas. I looked it up and it's on the wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Swift

Visit my blog:




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#1005 [url]

Aug 28 15 6:26 PM

Vickie wrote:
For anyone interested....

The kitchen staff at JAP posted in the announcement thread that they've noticed all the "chatter" about the new videos, and they wanted to provide an update.  This is the link to their update ...

http://www.justapinch.com/kitchen/notebook/read/148920/our-mission-will-always-be-to-champion-the-home-cook

Sounds like a load of it.
"Oh we have to have the video there because. Money"
"Later we will put member videos there instead." (no you won't-why? Money.)
This doesn't affect premium members or members on mobile, just a SMALL percentage of desktop users. (So it's okay to throw them under the bus?)
If they can't pay their overhead, they need to load ads on the bottom next to that WFC ad they already have. And stop eating the poison cheese Scripps is handing them.
Will they do this? I doubt it.
Money corrupts and Scripps is rolling in it. That guy lives about 20 miles from here and you can see the cash in Indian Hill piled high as Mt. Rainier. He's one of the extremely few people in Cinti that are actually "really" wealthy so we know all about him. (especially who he funds politically)

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#1006 [url]

Aug 28 15 9:28 PM

Sue Lau wrote:

Susie D wrote:

Bayhill wrote:

I'll sign up for Munching Minions. I'll be doing:

George Strait (country)
Taylor Swift (pop)The Fabulous Thunderbirds (blues)



Bayhill,
I can't find anything on Taylor Swift living in Texas.  Did you? If not she'll need to be replaced.

Thanks! 

I had thought she lived in Texas. I looked it up and it's on the wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Swift

Sue, I read the same site yesterday and again this morning and all I saw about Texas was that her mother had lived there when she came to the US after leaving Singapore.

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#1008 [url]

Aug 29 15 12:37 AM

I have finished and reported the Exploring Texas challenge-player 2

Bandera, Texas

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Bandera is the County seat of Bandera County, in the Texas Hill Country, pop. 857 in the 2010 census.
Legend has it it was so named because back in the 19th century, a flag was placed at the top of a path that came to be called Bandera Pass, due to bandera being the Spanish word for flag.

Bandera was the starting point of the Great Western Cattle Trail, during the second half of the 19th century.

Bandera is about 2 hours southwest of Austin.  and 47 miles northwest of San Antonio, on the Medina River.  We chartered a tour van to take us from Austin to Bandera for the day.  We wanted to see Bandera because it is known as the "Cowboy Capital of the World".  On Sunday mornings, Bandera is a popular destination for motorcyclists from San Antonio, known as the Bandera Breakfast Run.image

Our first stop along the way is in San Marcos, home to Texas State Universityabout 30 miles outside Austin.  We go to the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, formerly the Aquarena Center, on Spring Lake, to take the Glass Bottomed Boat tour.  The tour lasts about 30 minutes.  Since 1945, the glass-bottom boat tours in San Marcos have given folks of all ages an "in-depth" look at the timeless beauty of the San Marcos river. As the boats glide across the crystal waters of Spring Lake you'll see why ancient peoples revered this place. You'll also see some of the 1,000 springs that form the headwaters of one of the most beautiful rivers in Central Texas; and catch glimpses of the inhabitants here too. Bluegill Sunfish, Channel Catfish, Soft Shell turtles, all call Spring Lake home.

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We pile back into the van after coffee and a nosh and head straight through to Bandera., where we stop at Brick’s River Cafe for lunch.  Then back into the van to the Frontier Times Museum.  As visitors walk through the museum’s doors, they are transported back to the days when museums served as cabinets of curiosities, displaying wonderful and weird treasures.   Museum founder and luminary, J. Marvin Hunter, Sr., never said no to a gift to the museum’s collection.  He felt that if the artifact was important to the donor, then it should be important to everyone.  This resulted in the museum’s eclectic and eccentric collection that has amazed visitors for 80 years.  Today, the museum also serves to honor the legacies of the American cowboy and our ranching traditions with displays on local rodeo champions, the Harvey Chelf Barbed Wire Collection, the Debbie Henderson Western Hat Collection, and the Frontier Times Museum Texas Heroes Hall of Honor.  

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Bandera's title, "Cowboy Capital of the World" originated when it became a staging area for the last great cattle drives of the late 1800s. Confirming Bandera as the "Cowboy Capital of the World", a bronze monument honoring the many National Rodeo Champions who call Bandera home, stands on the Courthouse lawn.  



We did a walking tour of Bandera which included seeing some of the following:

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HISTORICAL WALKING TOUR OF BANDERA

1. Schmidtke-Callahan House (McMullan Insurance) (1870): Built by James Henry White of Georgia for Charles F. Schmidtke, early-day merchant, sawmill and gristmill operator. Recorded Texas Historical Lankmark.

2. Old Jail (1881): Designed by noted English architect, Alfred Giles, who designed a lot of Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark andlisted on the National Historical Register.

3. Old Courthouse (JP Offices) (1865): Built by Henry White as a store. Purchased by the county in 1877 and used as a Courthouse until 1890. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark. On National Register.

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4. Carmichael and Hay Store (Western Trail Antiques Mall of Bandera) (1868): Built by Henry White and operated as a general store. This structure claims the oldest elevator west of San Antonio.

5. Huffmeyer Store (Shoe Biz & The Junction) (1878): Built by B.F. Langford for Emil Huffmeyer. Recorded Texas HistoricalLandmark.

6. O.S.T. (Old Spanish Trail) (1921): Established across Main Street and moved to present location (previous site of Huffmeyer Store's wagon yard) in 1923. Building burned in 1933 but the O.S.T. continued operations in nearby location until present rock building was constructed that same year.

7. Old First National Bank (1875): Built of limestone by W.J. "Short Bill" Davenport and operated as a private bank for several years.

8. Lee Risinger Store: Second home of First State Bank. Adjacent building was Cox Hall, Bandera's first theater.

9. The Silver Dollar (1901): First as the Fox Hole and later Arkey Blue's Silver Dollar, it's the oldest continuously operating honkytonk in Texas.

10. Stein's of Bandera(1908): First housed the feed store of Henry and Tom Stevens and later was the B.F. Langford and Son Hardware Store. The Langfords also operated a funeral parlor here.

11. Oldest stone building in Bandera (1855): Built by P.D. Saner, this much altered structure was used as a courthouse, school, store, funeral home with the first ambulance/hearse in Bandera County, and residence. It was sold in 1869 to Henry Stevens, Sr. for $75.00.

12.Old First State Bank (Law Office) (1850): On a site bought by John James in 1842, the old two-story rock building was used for a school between 1860 and 1879. In the 1880s, it was known as the Bandera Institute, operated by a Professor Ryan, thought by some to be the fugitive John Wilkes Booth. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark.

13. M. Boyle Store (Antique Store) (1908): A frame building with a false front. Established by Irish immigrant brothers, it was an active turn of the century business.

14. Old Blacksmith Shop (1850s): Used by John James and Charles de Montel while surveying the town. It was used by the Methodist Church in mid 1860s; B.F. Langford's cabinet shop during the 1870's; blacksmith and wheelwright shop and later from the 1920s to 1950s it was a doctors office.

15. River Front Motel (1947): Originally the Half Circle Courts. House that serves as office was built in the 1880s.

16. Catholic Cemetery (1850s): Established after 16 Polish families came to Bandera in 1855. Names of these early immigrants are listed on a monument in front of the church.

17. Old Rectory (1930): Built from stone from a previously used addition to the church.

18. St. Stanislaus Catholic Church (1876): Established by the Polish colonists who came to Bandera in 1855. Their 1858 log building was located where the present gothic vernacular stone structure stands. It is the second oldest Polish church in Texas. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark.

19. Jureczki-Tobin House (1876): Built by Mr. And Mrs. Franz Jureczki, early pioneer colonists from Poland. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark. On National register.

20. St. Joseph's Convent-Parish Museum (1874): Originally erected for the Sisters of the Immaculate Conception as a convent; later used as a school for children of early Polish settlers. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark.

21. St. Joseph's School (Parish Hall) (1920): This hipped-roof symmetrical two story rock structure was designed from older plans of the Bandera Public School Building making it look older that it really is.

22. Carmichael Home (Mansion in Bandera) (1890): Built by H.H. Carmichael. This house was started in Medina, Texas. An Indian raid so disturbed Carmichael's wife, that he moved it down river to Bandera.

23. First Methodist Church (1867): The original frame building was later replaced by a stone structure that has since been enlarged to its present architectural plan. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark.

24. Kronkosky Library (1934): a WPA project of the great depression era. Remodeled in the 1970s and enlarged in 2002.

25. Bandera School Campus (Old High School built by WPA, 1937; Old Elementary School, 1913): The 1913 school was the first substantially built, multi-room public school in the area and is still in continuous use.

26. Cabaret (1936): Such stars as Jim Reeves, Bob Wills, Willie Nelson and many other giants of Country/Western music have played this dance hall.

27. Courthouse (1890): Designed by B.F. Trester, Jr., work started by Ed Braden and Son of San Antonio and completed by E. Huffmeyer, local merchant and contractor. Stone for the building was quarried locally and laid by itinerant Russian stonemasons. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark. On National Register.

28. First Baptist Church (1908): The entire block was bought in 1883 and given to the church by F.L. Hicks in 1884. The old church was completed in 1908 and later replaced by the present structure in1908.

29. Frontier Times Museum (1933): Built by frontier journalist-historian J. Marvin Hunter to house collections of Texana. Maintained by Frontier Times Museum, Inc. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark.

Exhausted, we piled back into the van and headed back to Austin, stopping in New Braunfels along the way for dinner at Cooper's Old Time Pit Bar-B-Que.

By the time we arrived back in Austin, we were all ready to collapse into our beds to rest up for the next sightseeing trip.

Last Edited By: Mikekey Aug 29 15 12:42 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#1009 [url]

Aug 29 15 12:55 AM

Mikekey wrote:

Sue Lau wrote:

Susie D wrote:

Bayhill wrote:

I'll sign up for Munching Minions. I'll be doing:

George Strait (country)
Taylor Swift (pop)The Fabulous Thunderbirds (blues)



Bayhill,
I can't find anything on Taylor Swift living in Texas.  Did you? If not she'll need to be replaced.

Thanks! 

I had thought she lived in Texas. I looked it up and it's on the wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Swift

Sue, I read the same site yesterday and again this morning and all I saw about Texas was that her mother had lived there when she came to the US after leaving Singapore.

I believe youre right, I misread it thinking her mom moved her to Texas when she was ten, but it was her mom that was 10. LOL

Visit my blog:




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#1010 [url]

Aug 29 15 3:18 AM

My challenge post for Exploring the Regions of Texas is done.
It is image heavy, so not going to copy it--because posting images here is a p-i-t-a, but you can easily click this little linky-doo-to-the-rescue.
It's easy, just like me.
Easy, but not cheap. Haha! Or so my story goes. And I'm sticking to it.
http://4foodfriendsandfun.yuku.com/reply/54841/Exploring-the-Regions-of-Texas#reply-54841

Visit my blog:




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#1011 [url]

Aug 29 15 5:21 AM

Sue Lau wrote:
Mikekey wrote:
I won a Food.com coffee cup I use to scoop potting soil into pots.

My cat, having just walked up to the laptop screen,  and peeking at what you wrote, let out a big meow.
I speak fluent kittese and can translate for you: "Meow!" (Mom, you could have used yours to scoop my box, a nice pooper scooper)
I swear my cats are snarkier than I am. Haha
Just goes to show. Nobody likes Scripps. Not even cats.  wink.gif
I have 2 aprons and a coffee mug from the ZWT @ f.c ... I actually love the aprons, and since they are splattered with food stains don't care about the f.c logo.  And then coffee mug is a great size.  I kept it all since I really enjoyed the ZWT and was excited to be on a 2nd or 3rd place team smiley: happy  

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#1014 [url]

Aug 29 15 6:16 AM

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Here are the Round 2 scores.
Required recipes, challenges, and Express 2 True Story are included in the scores.


Cherry Bombers
Ireland
SI's - 25
Step up - 35
In the Spotlight - 30
Key Bonus - 0
Ireland total - 150

Quebec
SI's - 15
Step Up - 5
In the Spotlight - 30
Key Bonus - 5
Quebec total - 112

Total Round 2 - 277

Adjustments to score.
Quebec

SI's
+5 points - baking soda in gift 1
-5 points - #8 - review states that blueberries were used rather than dried cranberries

Spotlight
+5 points - #1 - preheat broiler


LBOB
Ireland
SI's - 20
Step up - 20
In the Spotlight - 25
Key Bonus - 0
Ireland total - 122

Quebec
SI's - 20
Step Up - 5
In the Spotlight - 20
Key Bonus - 0
Quebec  total - 99.5

Total Round 2 - 236.5

Adjustments to score.
Ireland

SI's
+5 points - oatmeal #9



Munching Minions
Ireland
SI's - 30
Step up - 20
In the Spotlight - 25
Key Bonus - 0
Ireland total - 135

Quebec
SI's - 10
Step Up - 5
In the Spotlight - 20
Key Bonus - 0
Quebec  total - 92

Total Round 2 - 242



Toasted Tourists
Ireland
SI's - 20
Step up - 10
In the Spotlight - 30
Key Bonus - 0
Ireland total - 120

Quebec
SI's - 25
Step Up - 05
In the Spotlight - 25
Key Bonus - 0
Quebec  total - 111

Total Round 2 - 246

Adjustments to score.
Quebec

SI's
+5 points - barley #9

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#1016 [url]

Aug 29 15 1:53 PM

Howdy y'all! I hope you are enjoying your visit to Texas.
I'd like to introduce you to a true Texas treasure.......Carol Burnett!

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The entertainment world has enjoyed a five-decade love affair with comedienne/singer Carol Burnett. It was Burnett's traumatic childhood that set the stage for her comedy.

Carol's rags-to-riches story started out in San Antonio, Texas, on April 26, 1933, where she was born to Jodie and Louise Burnett, both of whom suffered from acute alcoholism. As a child, she was left in the care of a beloved grandmother,Mabel Eudora White, who shuttled the two of them off to Hollywood, California, where they lived in a boarding house and shared a great passion for the Golden Age of movies.

Lucille Ball, who had been Carol's treasured idol growing up, subsequently became a friend and mentor to the rising funny girl. Hilarious as a guest star on The Lucy Show (1962), Ms. Ball was so convinced of Carol's talent that she offered Carol her own Desilu-produced sitcom, but Burnett had her heart set on fronting a variety show. With her own team of second bananas, including character crony Harvey Korman, handsome foil Lyle Waggoner, and lookalike "kid sister" type Vicki Lawrence, the The Carol Burnett Show (1967) became an instant sensation, and earned 22 Emmy Awards during its 11-year run. It allowed Carol to fire off her wide range of comedy and musical ammunition--whether running amok in broad sketch comedy, parodying movie icons such as Gloria Swanson, Shirley Temple, Vivien Leigh or Joan Crawford, or singing/gushing alongside favorite vocalists Jim Nabors, Steve Lawrence, Peggy Lee, Sammy Davis Jr., Ella Fitzgerald and Mel Tormé.

She earned an Emmy nomination for her gripping portrayal of anti-Vietnam War activist Peg Mullen in Friendly Fire (1979), and convincingly played a woman coming to terms with her alcoholism in Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice (1982).

In 1981, she successfully sued the "National Enquirer" for libel, prompted by its article describing her alleged public drunkenness during an altercation with then-Secretary of State Henry Kissinger while in a Washington restaurant. The case remains a landmark in the study of libel cases involving celebrities, even though the unprecedented $1.6 million verdict (including $300,000 in personal damages and $1.3 million in "punitive" damages) was later reduced on appeal and the case was eventually settled out of court. Burnett donated the money to charity. She said she pursued the lawsuit because, as the daughter of two deceased alcoholics, the gossip paper's fabrication wounded her emotionally and that they should be punished for their irresponsibility when writing lies about celebrities.

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